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1 : On the weather side, or toward the wind; in the direction from which the wind blows; -- opposed to alee; as, helm aweather!

2 : Made or done in pleasant weather, or in circumstances involving but little exposure or sacrifice; as, a fair-weather voyage.

3 : Appearing only when times or circumstances are prosperous; as, a fair-weather friend.

4 : To expose too long to the influence of the weather.

5 : The state of the air or atmosphere with respect to heat or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness, or any other meteorological phenomena; meteorological condition of the atmosphere; as, warm weather; cold weather; wet weather; dry weather, etc.

6 : Vicissitude of season; meteorological change; alternation of the state of the air.

7 : Storm; tempest.

8 : A light rain; a shower.

9 : of Weather

10 : of Weather

11 : To expose to the air; to air; to season by exposure to air.

12 : Hence, to sustain the trying effect of; to bear up against and overcome; to sustain; to endure; to resist; as, to weather the storm.

13 : To sail or pass to the windward of; as, to weather a cape; to weather another ship.

14 : To place (a hawk) unhooded in the open air.

15 : To undergo or endure the action of the atmosphere; to suffer meteorological influences; sometimes, to wear away, or alter, under atmospheric influences; to suffer waste by weather.

16 : Being toward the wind, or windward -- opposed to lee; as, weather bow, weather braces, weather gauge, weather lifts, weather quarter, weather shrouds, etc.

17 : Beaten or harassed by the weather; worn by exposure to the weather, especially to severe weather.

18 : A turn of the cable about the end of the windlass, without the bits.

19 : To take another turn with, as a cable around a windlass.

20 : Eaten into, defaced, or worn, by exposure to the weather.

21 : That side of a vessel which is toward the wind; the windward side.

22 : A piece of plank placed in a porthole, or other opening, to keep out water.

23 : A board extending from the ridge to the eaves along the slope of the gable, and forming a close junction between the shingling of a roof and the side of the building beneath.

24 : A clapboard or feather-edged board used in weatherboarding.

25 : To nail boards upon so as to lap one over another, in order to exclude rain, snow, etc.

26 : The covering or siding of a building, formed of boards lapping over one another, to exclude rain, snow, etc.

27 : Boards adapted or intended for such use.

28 : Kept in port or at anchor by storms; delayed by bad weather; as, a weather-bound vessel.

29 : A vane, or weather vane; -- so called because originally often in the figure of a cock, turning on the top of a spire with the wind, and showing its direction.

30 : Hence, any thing or person that turns easily and frequently; one who veers with every change of current opinion; a fickle, inconstant person.

31 : To supply with a weathercock; to serve as a weathercock for.

32 : Driven by winds or storms; forced by stress of weather.

33 : Made sloping, so as to throw off water; as, a weathered cornice or window sill.

34 : Having the surface altered in color, texture, or composition, or the edges rounded off by exposure to the elements.

35 : To defend from the weather; to shelter.

36 : An instrument to indicate the state of the atmosphere, especially changes of atmospheric pressure, and hence changes of weather, as a barometer or baroscope.

37 : The action of the elements on a rock in altering its color, texture, or composition, or in rounding off its edges.

38 : The quality of being weatherly.

39 : Working, or able to sail, close to the wind; as, a weatherly ship.

40 : Being farthest to the windward.

41 : Proof against rough weather.

42 : Skillful in forecasting the changes of the weather.

43 : Something that foreshows the weather.

44 : Worn by the action of, or by exposure to, the weather.

(44) words is found which contain weather in our database

For weather word found data is following....

1 : Aweather

adv.

On the weather side, or toward the wind; in the direction from which the wind blows; -- opposed to alee; as, helm aweather!

2 : Fair-weather

a.

Made or done in pleasant weather, or in circumstances involving but little exposure or sacrifice; as, a fair-weather voyage.

3 : Fair-weather

a.

Appearing only when times or circumstances are prosperous; as, a fair-weather friend.

4 : Overweather

v. t.

To expose too long to the influence of the weather.

5 : Weather

n.

The state of the air or atmosphere with respect to heat or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness, or any other meteorological phenomena; meteorological condition of the atmosphere; as, warm weather; cold weather; wet weather; dry weather, etc.

6 : Weather

n.

Vicissitude of season; meteorological change; alternation of the state of the air.

7 : Weather

n.

Storm; tempest.

8 : Weather

n.

A light rain; a shower.

9 : Weathered

imp. & p. p.

of Weather

10 : Weathering

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Weather

11 : Weather

v. t.

To expose to the air; to air; to season by exposure to air.

12 : Weather

v. t.

Hence, to sustain the trying effect of; to bear up against and overcome; to sustain; to endure; to resist; as, to weather the storm.

13 : Weather

v. t.

To sail or pass to the windward of; as, to weather a cape; to weather another ship.

14 : Weather

v. t.

To place (a hawk) unhooded in the open air.

15 : Weather

v. i.

To undergo or endure the action of the atmosphere; to suffer meteorological influences; sometimes, to wear away, or alter, under atmospheric influences; to suffer waste by weather.

16 : Weather

a.

Being toward the wind, or windward -- opposed to lee; as, weather bow, weather braces, weather gauge, weather lifts, weather quarter, weather shrouds, etc.

17 : Weather-beaten

a.

Beaten or harassed by the weather; worn by exposure to the weather, especially to severe weather.

18 : Weather-bit

n.

A turn of the cable about the end of the windlass, without the bits.

19 : Weatherbit

v. t.

To take another turn with, as a cable around a windlass.

20 : Weather-bitten

a.

Eaten into, defaced, or worn, by exposure to the weather.

21 : Weatherboard

n.

That side of a vessel which is toward the wind; the windward side.

22 : Weatherboard

n.

A piece of plank placed in a porthole, or other opening, to keep out water.

23 : Weatherboard

n.

A board extending from the ridge to the eaves along the slope of the gable, and forming a close junction between the shingling of a roof and the side of the building beneath.

24 : Weatherboard

n.

A clapboard or feather-edged board used in weatherboarding.

25 : Weather-board

v. t.

To nail boards upon so as to lap one over another, in order to exclude rain, snow, etc.

26 : Weatherboarding

n.

The covering or siding of a building, formed of boards lapping over one another, to exclude rain, snow, etc.

27 : Weatherboarding

n.

Boards adapted or intended for such use.

28 : Weather-bound

a.

Kept in port or at anchor by storms; delayed by bad weather; as, a weather-bound vessel.

29 : Weathercock

n.

A vane, or weather vane; -- so called because originally often in the figure of a cock, turning on the top of a spire with the wind, and showing its direction.

30 : Weathercock

n.

Hence, any thing or person that turns easily and frequently; one who veers with every change of current opinion; a fickle, inconstant person.

31 : Weathercock

v. t.

To supply with a weathercock; to serve as a weathercock for.

32 : Weather-driven

a.

Driven by winds or storms; forced by stress of weather.

33 : Weathered

a.

Made sloping, so as to throw off water; as, a weathered cornice or window sill.

34 : Weathered

a.

Having the surface altered in color, texture, or composition, or the edges rounded off by exposure to the elements.

35 : Weather-fend

v. t.

To defend from the weather; to shelter.

36 : Weatherglass

n.

An instrument to indicate the state of the atmosphere, especially changes of atmospheric pressure, and hence changes of weather, as a barometer or baroscope.

37 : Weathering

n.

The action of the elements on a rock in altering its color, texture, or composition, or in rounding off its edges.

38 : Weatherliness

n.

The quality of being weatherly.

39 : Weatherly

a.

Working, or able to sail, close to the wind; as, a weatherly ship.

40 : Weathermost

a.

Being farthest to the windward.

41 : Weatherproof

a.

Proof against rough weather.

42 : Weatherwise

a.

Skillful in forecasting the changes of the weather.

43 : Weatherwiser

n.

Something that foreshows the weather.

44 : Weatherworn

a.

Worn by the action of, or by exposure to, the weather.

This word weather uses (7) total characters with white space

This word weather uses (7) total characters with white out space

This word weather uses 6 unique characters: A E H R T W

Number of all permutations npr for weather word is (720)

Number of all combination ncr for weather word is (720)

Similar matching soundex word for weather

2 same character containing word for weather

3 same character containing word For weather

All permutations word for weather

All combinations word for weather

All similar letter combinations related to weather

From Wikipedia

Thunderstorm near Garajau, Madeira

Weather is the state of the atmosphere, describing for example the degree to which it is hot or cold, wet or dry, calm or stormy, clear or cloudy.[1] Most weather phenomena occur in the lowest level of the atmosphere, the troposphere,[2][3] just below the stratosphere. Weather refers to day-to-day temperature and precipitation activity, whereas climate is the term for the averaging of atmospheric conditions over longer periods of time.[4] When used without qualification, "weather" is generally understood to mean the weather of Earth.

Weather is driven by air pressure, temperature and moisture differences between one place and another. These differences can occur due to the sun's angle at any particular spot, which varies with latitude. The strong temperature contrast between polar and tropical air gives rise to the largest scale atmospheric circulations: the Hadley Cell, the Ferrel Cell, the Polar Cell, and the jet stream. Weather systems in the mid-latitudes, such as extratropical cyclones, are caused by instabilities of the jet stream flow. Because the Earth's axis is tilted relative to its orbital plane, sunlight is incident at different angles at different times of the year. On Earth's surface, temperatures usually range ±40 °C (−40 °F to 100 °F) annually. Over thousands of years, changes in Earth's orbit can affect the amount and distribution of solar energy received by the Earth, thus influencing long-term climate and global climate change.

Surface temperature differences in turn cause pressure differences. Higher altitudes are cooler than lower altitudes, as most atmospheric heating is due to contact with the Earth's surface while radiative losses to space are mostly constant. Weather forecasting is the application of science and technology to predict the state of the atmosphere for a future time and a given location. The Earth's weather system is a chaotic system; as a result, small changes to one part of the system can grow to have large effects on the system as a whole. Human attempts to control the weather have occurred throughout history, and there is evidence that human activities such as agriculture and industry have modified weather patterns.

Studying how the weather works on other planets has been helpful in understanding how weather works on Earth. A famous landmark in the Solar System, Jupiter's Great Red Spot, is an anticyclonic storm known to have existed for at least 300 years. However, weather is not limited to planetary bodies. A star's corona is constantly being lost to space, creating what is essentially a very thin atmosphere throughout the Solar System. The movement of mass ejected from the Sun is known as the solar wind.

  1. ^ Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Weather. Retrieved on 27 June 2008.
  2. ^ Glossary of Meteorology. Hydrosphere. Retrieved on 27 June 2008.
  3. ^ Glossary of Meteorology. Troposphere. Retrieved on 27 June 2008.
  4. ^ "Climate". Glossary of Meteorology. American Meteorological Society. Retrieved 14 May 2008. 

From Wiktionary

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Etymology
    • 1.2 Pronunciation
    • 1.3 Noun
      • 1.3.1 Synonyms
      • 1.3.2 Hyponyms
      • 1.3.3 Derived terms
      • 1.3.4 Related terms
      • 1.3.5 Translations
    • 1.4 Verb
      • 1.4.1 Derived terms
      • 1.4.2 Translations
    • 1.5 Anagrams

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
weather
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English weder, wedir, from Old English weder, from Proto-Germanic *wedrą, from Proto-Indo-European *wedʰrom (=*we-dʰrom). Cognate with Saterland Frisian Weeder, West Frisian waar, Dutch weer, Low German Weder, German Wetter, Danish vejr, Swedish väder, Norwegian Bokmål vær, Norwegian Nynorsk vêr, Icelandic veður; also more distantly related to Russian вёдро (vjodro, fair weather) and perhaps Albanian vrëndë (light rain).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈwɛðə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈwɛðɚ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛðə(r)
  • Homophones: wether, whether (in accents with the wine-whine merger)
  • Hyphenation: wea‧ther

Noun[edit]

weather (countable and uncountable, plural weathers)

  1. The short term state of the atmosphere at a specific time and place, including the temperature, relative humidity, cloud cover, precipitation, wind, etc.
  2. Unpleasant or destructive atmospheric conditions, and their effects.
    Wooden garden furniture must be well oiled as it is continuously exposed to weather.
  3. (nautical) The direction from which the wind is blowing; used attributively to indicate the windward side.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby-Dick, ch. 3:
      One complained of a bad cold in his head, upon which Jonah mixed him a pitch-like potion of gin and molasses, which he swore was a sovereign cure for all colds and catarrhs whatsoever, never mind of how long standing, or whether caught off the coast of Labrador, or on the weather side of an ice-island.
  4. (countable, figuratively) A situation.
  5. (obsolete) A storm; a tempest.
    • Dryden
      What gusts of weather from that gathering cloud / My thoughts presage!
  6. (obsolete) A light shower of rain.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wyclif to this entry?)

Synonyms[edit]

  • (state of the atmosphere): meteorology
  • (windward side): weatherboard

Hyponyms[edit]

  • dirty weather
  • space weather

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

weather (third-person singular simple present weathers, present participle weathering, simple past and past participle weathered)

  1. To expose to the weather, or show the effects of such exposure, or to withstand such effects.
    • H. Miller
      The organisms [] seem indestructible, while the hard matrix in which they are embedded has weathered from around them.
    • Spenser
      [An eagle] soaring through his wide empire of the air / To weather his broad sails.
  2. (by extension) To sustain the trying effect of; to bear up against and overcome; to endure; to resist.
    • Longfellow
      For I can weather the roughest gale.
    • F. W. Robertson
      You will weather the difficulties yet.
  3. To break down, of rocks and other materials, under the effects of exposure to rain, sunlight, temperature, and air.
  4. (nautical) To pass to windward in a vessel, especially to beat 'round.
    to weather a cape; to weather another ship
  5. (nautical) To endure or survive an event or action without undue damage.
    Joshua weathered a collision with a freighter near South Africa.
  6. (falconry) To place (a hawk) unhooded in the open air.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Encyc. Brit to this entry?)

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

  • weareth, whate'er, wheater, whereat, wreathe