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1 : of Entreat

2 : of Entreat

3 : To treat, or conduct toward; to deal with; to use.

4 : To treat with, or in respect to, a thing desired; hence, to ask earnestly; to beseech; to petition or pray with urgency; to supplicate; to importune.

5 : To beseech or supplicate successfully; to prevail upon by prayer or solicitation; to persuade.

6 : To invite; to entertain.

7 : To treat or discourse; hence, to enter into negotiations, as for a treaty.

8 : To make an earnest petition or request.

9 : Entreaty.

10 : That may be entreated.

11 : Entreaty.

12 : One who entreats; one who asks earnestly; a beseecher.

13 : Full of entreaty. [R.] See Intreatful.

14 : In an entreating manner.

15 : Used in entreaty; pleading.

16 : Entreaty; invitation.

17 : of Entreaty

18 : Treatment; reception; entertainment.

19 : The act of entreating or beseeching; urgent prayer; earnest petition; pressing solicitation.

20 : A true copy, duplicate, or extract of an original writing or record, esp. of amercements or penalties set down in the rolls of court to be levied by the bailiff, or other officer.

21 : of Estreat

22 : of Estreat

23 : To extract or take out from the records of a court, and send up to the court of exchequer to be enforced; -- said of a forfeited recognizance.

24 : To bring in to the exchequer, as a fine.

25 : Extraction.

26 : To treat cruelly or improperly; to ill use; to maltreat.

27 : See Entreat.

28 : Not to be entreated; inexorable.

29 : Entreaty.

30 : Full of entreaty.

31 : See Maltreat.

32 : of Maltreat

33 : of Maltreat

34 : To treat ill; to abuse; to treat roughly.

35 : To treat wrongfully.

36 : To treat amiss; to abuse.

37 : Wrong treatment.

38 : The act of retiring or withdrawing one's self, especially from what is dangerous or disagreeable.

39 : The place to which anyone retires; a place or privacy or safety; a refuge; an asylum.

40 : The retiring of an army or body of men from the face of an enemy, or from any ground occupied to a greater distance from the enemy, or from an advanced position.

41 : The withdrawing of a ship or fleet from an enemy for the purpose of avoiding an engagement or escaping after defeat.

42 : A signal given in the army or navy, by the beat of a drum or the sounding of trumpet or bugle, at sunset (when the roll is called), or for retiring from action.

43 : A special season of solitude and silence to engage in religious exercises.

44 : A period of several days of withdrawal from society to a religious house for exclusive occupation in the duties of devotion; as, to appoint or observe a retreat.

45 : of Retreat

46 : of Retreat

47 : To make a retreat; to retire from any position or place; to withdraw; as, the defeated army retreated from the field.

48 : Furnishing or serving as a retreat.

49 : The act of retreating; specifically, the Hegira.

50 : of Treat

(50) words is found which contain treat in our database

For treat word found data is following....

1 : Entreated

imp. & p. p.

of Entreat

2 : Entreating

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Entreat

3 : Entreat

v. t.

To treat, or conduct toward; to deal with; to use.

4 : Entreat

v. t.

To treat with, or in respect to, a thing desired; hence, to ask earnestly; to beseech; to petition or pray with urgency; to supplicate; to importune.

5 : Entreat

v. t.

To beseech or supplicate successfully; to prevail upon by prayer or solicitation; to persuade.

6 : Entreat

v. t.

To invite; to entertain.

7 : Entreat

v. i.

To treat or discourse; hence, to enter into negotiations, as for a treaty.

8 : Entreat

v. i.

To make an earnest petition or request.

9 : Entreat

n.

Entreaty.

10 : Entreatable

a.

That may be entreated.

11 : Entreatance

n.

Entreaty.

12 : Entreater

n.

One who entreats; one who asks earnestly; a beseecher.

13 : Entreatful

a.

Full of entreaty. [R.] See Intreatful.

14 : Entreatingly

adv.

In an entreating manner.

15 : Entreative

a.

Used in entreaty; pleading.

16 : Entreatment

n.

Entreaty; invitation.

17 : Entreaties

pl.

of Entreaty

18 : Entreaty

n.

Treatment; reception; entertainment.

19 : Entreaty

n.

The act of entreating or beseeching; urgent prayer; earnest petition; pressing solicitation.

20 : Estreat

n.

A true copy, duplicate, or extract of an original writing or record, esp. of amercements or penalties set down in the rolls of court to be levied by the bailiff, or other officer.

21 : Estreated

imp. & p. p.

of Estreat

22 : Estreating

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Estreat

23 : Estreat

v. t.

To extract or take out from the records of a court, and send up to the court of exchequer to be enforced; -- said of a forfeited recognizance.

24 : Estreat

v. t.

To bring in to the exchequer, as a fine.

25 : Extreat

n.

Extraction.

26 : Illtreat

v. t.

To treat cruelly or improperly; to ill use; to maltreat.

27 : Intreat

v. t.

See Entreat.

28 : Intreatable

a.

Not to be entreated; inexorable.

29 : Intreatance

n.

Entreaty.

30 : Intreatful

a.

Full of entreaty.

31 : Maletreat

v. t.

See Maltreat.

32 : Maltreated

imp. & p. p.

of Maltreat

33 : Maltreating

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Maltreat

34 : Maltreat

v. t.

To treat ill; to abuse; to treat roughly.

35 : Misentreat

v. t.

To treat wrongfully.

36 : Mistreat

v. t.

To treat amiss; to abuse.

37 : Mistreatment

n.

Wrong treatment.

38 : Retreat

n.

The act of retiring or withdrawing one's self, especially from what is dangerous or disagreeable.

39 : Retreat

n.

The place to which anyone retires; a place or privacy or safety; a refuge; an asylum.

40 : Retreat

n.

The retiring of an army or body of men from the face of an enemy, or from any ground occupied to a greater distance from the enemy, or from an advanced position.

41 : Retreat

n.

The withdrawing of a ship or fleet from an enemy for the purpose of avoiding an engagement or escaping after defeat.

42 : Retreat

n.

A signal given in the army or navy, by the beat of a drum or the sounding of trumpet or bugle, at sunset (when the roll is called), or for retiring from action.

43 : Retreat

n.

A special season of solitude and silence to engage in religious exercises.

44 : Retreat

n.

A period of several days of withdrawal from society to a religious house for exclusive occupation in the duties of devotion; as, to appoint or observe a retreat.

45 : Retreated

imp. & p. p.

of Retreat

46 : Retreating

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Retreat

47 : Retreat

v. i.

To make a retreat; to retire from any position or place; to withdraw; as, the defeated army retreated from the field.

48 : Retreatful

a.

Furnishing or serving as a retreat.

49 : Retreatment

n.

The act of retreating; specifically, the Hegira.

50 : Treated

imp. & p. p.

of Treat

This word treat uses (5) total characters with white space

This word treat uses (5) total characters with white out space

This word treat uses 4 unique characters: A E R T

Number of all permutations npr for treat word is (24)

Number of all combination ncr for treat word is (24)

Similar matching soundex word for treat

2 same character containing word for treat

3 same character containing word For treat

4 same character containing word For treat

All permutations word for treat

All combinations word for treat

All similar letter combinations related to treat

From Wikipedia

Treat, Treats, or TREAT may refer to:

From Wiktionary

See also: Treat

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Etymology
    • 1.2 Pronunciation
    • 1.3 Verb
      • 1.3.1 Usage notes
      • 1.3.2 Synonyms
      • 1.3.3 Derived terms
      • 1.3.4 Related terms
      • 1.3.5 Translations
    • 1.4 Noun
      • 1.4.1 Derived terms
      • 1.4.2 Translations
    • 1.5 Anagrams

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English treten, from Anglo-Norman treter, Old French tretier, traiter, from Latin trāctare (to pull", "to manage), from the past participle stem of trahere (to draw", "to pull).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) IPA(key): /tɹit/, [tɹiʔ(t̚)], [t͡ʃɹiʔ(t̚)]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːt

Verb[edit]

treat (third-person singular simple present treats, present participle treating, simple past and past participle treated)

  1. (intransitive) To negotiate, discuss terms, bargain (for or with). [from 13th c.]
    • 1955, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Return of the King, George Allen & Unwin:
      Now halting a few paces before the Captains of the West he looked them up and down and laughed. 'Is there any in this rout with authority to treat with me?' he asked.
    • 1985, Lawrence Durrell, Quinx, Faber & Faber 2004 (Avignon Quintet), p. 1365:
      After all, in this hideous war we have just passed through never forget that Halifax would have treated with Hitler: it took Churchill to refuse.
    • 2010, David Mitchell, The Observer, 6 Jun 2010:
      I wouldn't promote businesses I considered immoral – ambulance-chasing lawyers or online roulette for example – but I've got nothing against computer or software manufacture: they're important and any reputable company in that industry is welcome to treat for my services.
  2. (intransitive) To discourse; to handle a subject in writing or speaking; to conduct a discussion. [from 14th c.]
    Cicero's writing treats mainly of old age and personal duty.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling
      And, indeed, should the excellent Mr Broughton be prevailed on to set fist to paper, and to complete the above-said rudiments, by delivering down the true principles of athletics, I question whether the world will have any cause to lament, that none of the great writers, either antient or modern, have ever treated about that noble and useful art.
    • Milton
      Now of love they treat.
  3. (transitive) To discourse on; to represent or deal with in a particular way, in writing or speaking. [from 14th c.]
    The article treated feminism as a quintessentially modern movement.
  4. (transitive, intransitive, obsolete) To entreat or beseech (someone). [14th-17th c.]
    Only let my family live, I treat thee.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ld. Berners to this entry?)
  5. (transitive) To handle, deal with or behave towards in a specific way. [from 14th c.]
    You treated me like a fool.
    She was tempted to treat the whole affair as a joke.
  6. (transitive) To entertain with food or drink, especially at one's own expense; to show hospitality to; to pay for as celebration or reward. [from 16th c.]
    I treated my son to some popcorn in the interval.
    I've done so well this month, I'll treat you all to dinner (or 'Dinner is my treat.)
    My husband treated me to a Paris holiday for our anniversary.
    1. (Britain, politics) To commit the offence of providing food, drink, entertainment or provision to corruptly influence a voter.
  7. (transitive) To care for medicinally or surgically; to apply medical care to. [from 18th c.]
    They treated me for malaria.
  8. (transitive) To subject to a chemical or other action; to act upon with a specific scientific result in mind. [from 19th c.]
    He treated the substance with sulphuric acid.
    I treated the photo somewhat to make the colours more pronounced.
  9. To provide something special and pleasant.
    • 2012, Chelsea 6-0 Wolves [1]
      The Chelsea captain was a virtual spectator as he was treated to his side's biggest win for almost two years as Stamford Bridge serenaded him with chants of "there's only one England captain," some 48 hours after he announced his retirement from international football.

Usage notes[edit]

In the dialects found in Yorkshire and North East England, the past tense and past participle form tret (/tɹɛt/) is sometimes encountered.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (to deal with in a very specific way): behandle
  • (give medical care or attention to): leech, make better

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

treat (plural treats)

  1. An entertainment, outing, or other indulgence provided by someone for the enjoyment of others.
    I took the kids to the zoo for a treat.
  2. An unexpected gift, event etc., which provides great pleasure.
    It was such a treat to see her back in action on the London stage.
  3. (obsolete) A parley or discussion of terms; a negotiation.
  4. (obsolete) An entreaty.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

  • atter, tater, tetra, tetra-