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1 : The time at or near All Saints, or November 1st.

2 : The Pleiades or seven stars, fabled to have been the daughters of Atlas.

3 : Time of the festival of St. Bartholomew, August 24th.

4 : of Betide

5 : To happen to; to befall; to come to ; as, woe betide the wanderer.

6 : To come to pass; to happen; to occur.

7 : A small, clear space in the segments of the ovum, the precursor of the nucleus.

8 : Caryatids.

9 : The season of Christmas.

10 : An order of Crinoidea, mostly fossils of the Paleozoic rocks. They were usually roundish or egg-shaped, and often unsymmetrical; some were sessile, others had short stems.

11 : One of the Cystidea.

12 : The reflux of tide water; the retiring tide; -- opposed to flood tide.

13 : Same as Epiglottic.

14 : A rock occurring in the Alps, consisting of saussurite and smaragdite; -- sometimes called gabbro.

15 : The time of evening; evening.

16 : Of or pertaining to the glottis; glottal.

17 : A white crystalline substance obtained by the partial reduction of isatin.

18 : A white, crystalline substance, obtained from also, by extension, any similar substance.

19 : Broad-toothed.

20 : The season of Lenten or Lent.

21 : A compound of mercaptan formed by replacing its sulphur hydrogen by a metal; as, potassium mercaptide, C2H5SK.

22 : To happen or come to pass unfortunately; also, to suffer evil fortune.

23 : Morning time.

24 : Having many teeth, or toothlike processes.

25 : The time of noon; midday.

26 : Frequently; often.

27 : Open time; -- applied to different things

28 : The early spring, or the time when flowers begin opening.

29 : The time between Epiphany and Ash Wednesday wherein marriages were formerly solemnized publicly in churches. [Eng.]

30 : The time after harvest when the common fields are open to all kinds of stock.

31 : The last fortnight of Lent.

32 : A formative particle of albuminous matter; a monad; a cytode. See the Note under Morphon.

33 : One of the many minute granules found in the protoplasm of vegetable cells. They are divided by their colors into three classes, chloroplastids, chromoplastids, and leucoplastids.

34 : A division of Gregarinae including those that have two or more internal divisions of the body.

35 : of Proglottis

36 : The days immediately preceding Ash Widnesday, especially the period between the evening before Quinguagesima Sunday and the morning of Ash Wednesday.

37 : The time of spring; springtime.

38 : Staurolite.

39 : Summer time.

40 : Time; period; season.

41 : The alternate rising and falling of the waters of the ocean, and of bays, rivers, etc., connected therewith. The tide ebbs and flows twice in each lunar day, or the space of a little more than twenty-four hours. It is occasioned by the attraction of the sun and moon (the influence of the latter being three times that of the former), acting unequally on the waters in different parts of the earth, thus disturbing their equilibrium. A high tide upon one side of the earth is accompanied by a high tide upon the opposite side. Hence, when the sun and moon are in conjunction or opposition, as at new moon and full moon, their action is such as to produce a greater than the usual tide, called the spring tide, as represented in the cut. When the moon is in the first or third quarter, the sun's attraction in part counteracts the effect of the moon's attraction, thus producing under the moon a smaller tide than usual, called the neap tide.

42 : A stream; current; flood; as, a tide of blood.

43 : Tendency or direction of causes, influences, or events; course; current.

44 : Violent confluence.

45 : The period of twelve hours.

46 : To cause to float with the tide; to drive or carry with the tide or stream.

47 : To betide; to happen.

48 : To pour a tide or flood.

49 : To work into or out of a river or harbor by drifting with the tide and anchoring when it becomes adverse.

50 : Affected by the tide; having a tide.

(50) words is found which contain tide in our database

For tide word found data is following....

1 : Allhallowtide

n.

The time at or near All Saints, or November 1st.

2 : Atlantides

n. pl.

The Pleiades or seven stars, fabled to have been the daughters of Atlas.

3 : Bartholomew tide

Time of the festival of St. Bartholomew, August 24th.

4 : Betided

imp. & p. p.

of Betide

5 : Betide

v. t.

To happen to; to befall; to come to ; as, woe betide the wanderer.

6 : Betide

v. i.

To come to pass; to happen; to occur.

7 : Blastide

n.

A small, clear space in the segments of the ovum, the precursor of the nucleus.

8 : Caryatides

n. pl.

Caryatids.

9 : Christmastide

n.

The season of Christmas.

10 : Cystidea

n. pl.

An order of Crinoidea, mostly fossils of the Paleozoic rocks. They were usually roundish or egg-shaped, and often unsymmetrical; some were sessile, others had short stems.

11 : Cystidean

n.

One of the Cystidea.

12 : Ebb tide

The reflux of tide water; the retiring tide; -- opposed to flood tide.

13 : Epiglottidean

a.

Same as Epiglottic.

14 : Euphotide

n.

A rock occurring in the Alps, consisting of saussurite and smaragdite; -- sometimes called gabbro.

15 : Eventide

n.

The time of evening; evening.

16 : Glottidean

a.

Of or pertaining to the glottis; glottal.

17 : Isatide

n.

A white crystalline substance obtained by the partial reduction of isatin.

18 : Lactide

n.

A white, crystalline substance, obtained from also, by extension, any similar substance.

19 : Latidentate

a.

Broad-toothed.

20 : Lententide

n.

The season of Lenten or Lent.

21 : Mercaptide

n.

A compound of mercaptan formed by replacing its sulphur hydrogen by a metal; as, potassium mercaptide, C2H5SK.

22 : Mistide

v. i.

To happen or come to pass unfortunately; also, to suffer evil fortune.

23 : Morningtide

n.

Morning time.

24 : Multidentate

a.

Having many teeth, or toothlike processes.

25 : Noontide

n.

The time of noon; midday.

26 : Oftentide

adv.

Frequently; often.

27 : Opetide

n.

Open time; -- applied to different things

28 : Opetide

n.

The early spring, or the time when flowers begin opening.

29 : Opetide

n.

The time between Epiphany and Ash Wednesday wherein marriages were formerly solemnized publicly in churches. [Eng.]

30 : Opetide

n.

The time after harvest when the common fields are open to all kinds of stock.

31 : Passiontide

n.

The last fortnight of Lent.

32 : Plastide

n.

A formative particle of albuminous matter; a monad; a cytode. See the Note under Morphon.

33 : Plastide

n.

One of the many minute granules found in the protoplasm of vegetable cells. They are divided by their colors into three classes, chloroplastids, chromoplastids, and leucoplastids.

34 : Polycystidea

n. pl.

A division of Gregarinae including those that have two or more internal divisions of the body.

35 : Proglottides

pl.

of Proglottis

36 : Shrovetide

n.

The days immediately preceding Ash Widnesday, especially the period between the evening before Quinguagesima Sunday and the morning of Ash Wednesday.

37 : Springtide

n.

The time of spring; springtime.

38 : Staurotide

n.

Staurolite.

39 : Summertide

n.

Summer time.

40 : Tide

prep.

Time; period; season.

41 : Tide

prep.

The alternate rising and falling of the waters of the ocean, and of bays, rivers, etc., connected therewith. The tide ebbs and flows twice in each lunar day, or the space of a little more than twenty-four hours. It is occasioned by the attraction of the sun and moon (the influence of the latter being three times that of the former), acting unequally on the waters in different parts of the earth, thus disturbing their equilibrium. A high tide upon one side of the earth is accompanied by a high tide upon the opposite side. Hence, when the sun and moon are in conjunction or opposition, as at new moon and full moon, their action is such as to produce a greater than the usual tide, called the spring tide, as represented in the cut. When the moon is in the first or third quarter, the sun's attraction in part counteracts the effect of the moon's attraction, thus producing under the moon a smaller tide than usual, called the neap tide.

42 : Tide

prep.

A stream; current; flood; as, a tide of blood.

43 : Tide

prep.

Tendency or direction of causes, influences, or events; course; current.

44 : Tide

prep.

Violent confluence.

45 : Tide

prep.

The period of twelve hours.

46 : Tide

v. t.

To cause to float with the tide; to drive or carry with the tide or stream.

47 : Tide

n.

To betide; to happen.

48 : Tide

n.

To pour a tide or flood.

49 : Tide

n.

To work into or out of a river or harbor by drifting with the tide and anchoring when it becomes adverse.

50 : Tided

a.

Affected by the tide; having a tide.

This word tide uses (4) total characters with white space

This word tide uses (4) total characters with white out space

This word tide uses 4 unique characters: D E I T

Number of all permutations npr for tide word is (24)

Number of all combination ncr for tide word is (24)

Similar matching soundex word for tide

2 same character containing word for tide

3 same character containing word For tide

4 same character containing word For tide

All permutations word for tide

All combinations word for tide

All similar letter combinations related to tide

From Wikipedia

Photo of boat in water next to a dock
High tide, Alma, New Brunswick in the Bay of Fundy, 1972
Photo of boat resting on bottom next to dock
Low tide at the same fishing port in Bay of Fundy, 1972
Schematic of the lunar portion of Earth's tides showing (exaggerated) high tides at the sublunar and antipodal points for the hypothetical case of an ocean of constant depth with no land. There would also be smaller, superimposed bulges on the sides facing toward and away from the sun.
In Maine (U.S.) low tide occurs roughly at moonrise and high tide with a high moon, corresponding to the simple gravity model of two tidal bulges; at most places however, moon and tides have a phase shift.

Tides are the rise and fall of sea levels caused by the combined effects of the gravitational forces exerted by the Moon and the Sun and the rotation of Earth.

The times and amplitude of tides at any given locale are influenced by the alignment of the Sun and Moon, by the pattern of tides in the deep ocean, by the amphidromic systems of the oceans, and the shape of the coastline and near-shore bathymetry (see Timing). Some shorelines experience a semi-diurnal tide—two nearly equal high and low tides each day. Other locations experience a diurnal tide—only one high and low tide each day. A "mixed tide"—two uneven tides a day, or one high and one low—is also possible.[1][2][3]

Tides vary on timescales ranging from hours to years due to a number of factors. To make accurate records, tide gauges at fixed stations measure water level over time. Gauges ignore variations caused by waves with periods shorter than minutes. These data are compared to the reference (or datum) level usually called mean sea level.[4]

While tides are usually the largest source of short-term sea-level fluctuations, sea levels are also subject to forces such as wind and barometric pressure changes, resulting in storm surges, especially in shallow seas and near coasts.

Tidal phenomena are not limited to the oceans, but can occur in other systems whenever a gravitational field that varies in time and space is present. For example, the solid part of the Earth is affected by tides, though this is not as easily seen as the water tidal movements.

  1. ^ Reddy, M.P.M. & Affholder, M. (2002). Descriptive physical oceanography: State of the Art. Taylor and Francis. p. 249. ISBN 90-5410-706-5. OCLC 223133263. 
  2. ^ Hubbard, Richard (1893). Boater's Bowditch: The Small Craft American Practical Navigator. McGraw-Hill Professional. p. 54. ISBN 0-07-136136-7. OCLC 44059064. 
  3. ^ Coastal orientation and geometry affects the phase, direction, and amplitude of amphidromic systems, coastal Kelvin waves as well as resonant seiches in bays. In estuaries, seasonal river outflows influence tidal flow.
  4. ^ "Tidal lunar day". NOAA.  Do not confuse with the astronomical lunar day on the Moon. A lunar zenith is the Moon's highest point in the sky.

From Wiktionary

See also: Tide, tìde, and -tide

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Pronunciation
    • 1.2 Etymology 1
      • 1.2.1 Noun
        • 1.2.1.1 Derived terms
        • 1.2.1.2 Translations
      • 1.2.2 Verb
        • 1.2.2.1 Derived terms
        • 1.2.2.2 Translations
      • 1.2.3 See also
      • 1.2.4 References
    • 1.3 Etymology 2
      • 1.3.1 Verb
        • 1.3.1.1 Synonyms
    • 1.4 Anagrams
  • 2 Middle English
    • 2.1 Alternative forms
    • 2.2 Noun
      • 2.2.1 Related terms
  • 3 Norwegian Bokmål
    • 3.1 Noun
  • 4 Norwegian Nynorsk
    • 4.1 Noun
  • 5 Old English
    • 5.1 Noun

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
tide (disambiguation)
Wikipedia
Boats at low tide (periodic change of sea level).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: tīd, IPA(key): /taɪd/
  • (AAVE) IPA(key): /taːd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪd
  • Homophone: tied

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English tide, from Old English tīd (time, period, season, while; hour; feast-day, festal-tide; canonical hour or service), from Proto-Germanic *tīdiz (time, period), from Proto-Indo-European *dīti- (time, period), from Proto-Indo-European *dī- (time). Cognate with Scots tide, tyde (moment, time, occasion, period, tide), North Frisian tid (time), West Frisian tiid (time, while), Dutch tijd (time), Dutch tij, getij (tide of the sea), Low German Tied, Tiet (time), Low German Tide (tide of the sea), German Zeit (time), Danish tid (time), Swedish tid (time), Icelandic tíð (time), Albanian ditë (day), Old Armenian տի (ti, age), Kurdish dem (time). Related to time.

Noun[edit]

tide (plural tides)

Wikipedia has an article on:
tide
Wikipedia
  1. The periodic change of the sea level, particularly when caused by the gravitational influence of the sun and the moon.
  2. A stream, current or flood.
    (Can we date this quote?) Let in the tide of knaves once more; my cook and I'll provide. — Shakespeare, Timon of Athens, III-iv
  3. (chronology, obsolete, except in liturgy) Time, notably anniversary, period or season linked to an ecclesiastical feast.
    (Can we date this quote?) And rest their weary limbs a tide — Edmund Spenser
    (Can we date this quote?) Which, at the appointed tide, Each one did make his bride — Edmund Spenser
    (Can we date this quote?) At the tide of Christ his birth — Fuller
  4. (regional, archaic) A time.
    The doctor's no good this tide.
  5. (regional, archaic) A point or period of time identified or described by a qualifier (found in compounds).
    Eventide, noontide, morrowtide, nighttide, moon-tide, harvest-tide, wintertide, summertide, springtide, autumn-tide etc.,.
  6. (mining) The period of twelve hours.
  7. Something which changes like the tides of the sea.
  8. Tendency or direction of causes, influences, or events; course; current.
    (Can we date this quote?) There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune. — Shakespeare. Julius Caesar, IV-iii
  9. (obsolete) Violent confluence
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

tide (third-person singular simple present tides, present participle tiding, simple past and past participle tided)

  1. (transitive) To cause to float with the tide; to drive or carry with the tide or stream.
    • Feltham
      They are tided down the stream.
  2. (intransitive) To pour a tide or flood.
    The ocean tided most impressively, even frightening
  3. (intransitive, nautical) To work into or out of a river or harbor by drifting with the tide and anchoring when it becomes adverse.
Derived terms[edit]
  • tide over
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

  • ebb
  • flow
  • neap
  • spring

References[edit]

The Dictionary of the Scots Language

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English tiden, tide, from Old English tīdan (to happen).

Verb[edit]

tide (third-person singular simple present tides, present participle tiding, simple past and past participle tided)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To happen, occur.
    • Chaucer
      What should us tide of this new law?
Synonyms[edit]
  • betide, befall

Anagrams[edit]

  • DIET, Diet, diet, dite, diët, edit, edit., tied

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • tid, tyd

Noun[edit]

tide

  1. A time (period), season.
    This lusty summer’s tide — Geoffrey Chaucer
    • 1837 Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution: A History
      What is singular too, the spademen seem to work lazily; they will not work double-tides, even for offer of more wages, though their tide is but seven hours[.]

Related terms[edit]

  • betide

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

tide m, f

  1. dative form of tid

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

tide f

  1. dative form of tid

Old English[edit]

Noun[edit]

tīde

  1. plural of tīd
  2. accusative singular of tīd
  3. genitive singular of tīd
  4. dative singular of tīd
  5. accusative plural of tīd