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1 : Alt. of Compone

2 : See Compony.

3 : Alt. of Eponyme

4 : The hypothetical individual who is assumed as the person from whom any race, city, etc., took its name; as, Hellen is an eponym of the Hellenes.

5 : A name, as of a people, country, and the like, derived from that of an individual.

6 : Same as Eponymous.

7 : One from whom a race, tribe, city, or the like, took its name; an eponym.

8 : Relating to an eponym; giving one's name to a tribe, people, country, and the like.

9 : The derivation of the name of a race, tribe, etc., from that of a fabulous hero, progenitor, etc.

10 : An onyx, part or all of whose layers consist of jasper.

11 : A small horse.

12 : Twenty-five pounds sterling.

13 : A translation or a key used to avoid study in getting lessons; a crib.

14 : A small glass of beer.

15 : One of a small, hardy breed of horses, with long mane and tail, which originated in the Shetland Islands; a sheltie.

(15) words is found which contain pony in our database

For pony word found data is following....

1 : Compony

a.

Alt. of Compone

2 : Counter-compony

a.

See Compony.

3 : Eponym

n.

Alt. of Eponyme

4 : Eponyme

n.

The hypothetical individual who is assumed as the person from whom any race, city, etc., took its name; as, Hellen is an eponym of the Hellenes.

5 : Eponyme

n.

A name, as of a people, country, and the like, derived from that of an individual.

6 : Eponymic

a.

Same as Eponymous.

7 : Eponymist

n.

One from whom a race, tribe, city, or the like, took its name; an eponym.

8 : Eponymous

a.

Relating to an eponym; giving one's name to a tribe, people, country, and the like.

9 : Eponymy

n.

The derivation of the name of a race, tribe, etc., from that of a fabulous hero, progenitor, etc.

10 : Jasponyx

n.

An onyx, part or all of whose layers consist of jasper.

11 : Pony

n.

A small horse.

12 : Pony

n.

Twenty-five pounds sterling.

13 : Pony

n.

A translation or a key used to avoid study in getting lessons; a crib.

14 : Pony

n.

A small glass of beer.

15 : Shetland pony

One of a small, hardy breed of horses, with long mane and tail, which originated in the Shetland Islands; a sheltie.

This word pony uses (4) total characters with white space

This word pony uses (4) total characters with white out space

This word pony uses 4 unique characters: N O P Y

Number of all permutations npr for pony word is (24)

Number of all combination ncr for pony word is (24)

Similar matching soundex word for pony

2 same character containing word for pony

3 same character containing word For pony

4 same character containing word For pony

All permutations word for pony

All combinations word for pony

All similar letter combinations related to pony

From Wikipedia

A Highland Pony, demonstrating the pony characteristics of sturdy bone, thick mane and tail, small head, and small overall size.

A pony is a small horse[1][2][3] (Equus ferus caballus). Depending on context, a pony may be a horse that is under an approximate or exact height at the withers or a small horse with a specific conformation and temperament. There are many different breeds. Compared to other horses, ponies often exhibit thicker manes, tails and overall coat, as well as proportionally shorter legs, wider barrels, heavier bone, thicker necks, and shorter heads with broader foreheads. The word pony derives from the old French poulenet, meaning foal, a young, immature horse, but this is not the modern meaning; unlike a horse foal, a pony remains small when fully grown. However, on occasion, people who are unfamiliar with horses may confuse an adult pony with a foal.

The ancestors of most modern ponies developed small stature because they lived on the margins of livable horse habitat. These smaller animals were domesticated and bred for various purposes all over the Northern Hemisphere. Ponies were historically used for driving and freight transport, as children's mounts, for recreational riding, and later as competitors and performers in their own right. During the Industrial Revolution, particularly in Great Britain, a significant number were used as pit ponies, hauling loads of coal in the mines.

Ponies are generally considered intelligent and friendly, although sometimes they also are described as stubborn or cunning. Properly trained ponies are appropriate mounts for children who are learning to ride. Larger ponies can be ridden by adults, as ponies are usually strong for their size. In modern use, many organizations define a pony as a mature horse that measures less than 14.2 hands (58 inches, 147 cm) at the withers, but there are a number of exceptions. Different organizations that use a strict measurement model vary from 14 hands (56 inches, 142 cm) to nearly 14.3 hands (59 inches, 150 cm). Many breeds classify an animal as either horse or pony based on pedigree and phenotype, no matter its height. Some full-sized horses may be called ponies for various reasons of tradition or as a term of endearment.

  1. ^ Macdonald, A.M. (ed.) (1972). Chambers Twentieth Century Dictionary. Chambers. 
  2. ^ n.a. (2005). Oxford American Dictionaries (computer application). Apple Computer. 
  3. ^ Woolf, Henry (ed.) (1980). Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary. Springfield MA: Merriam. ISBN 0-87779-398-0. 

From Wiktionary

See also: Pony

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Pronunciation
    • 1.2 Etymology 1
      • 1.2.1 Noun
        • 1.2.1.1 Synonyms
        • 1.2.1.2 Derived terms
        • 1.2.1.3 Translations
      • 1.2.2 Verb
    • 1.3 Etymology 2
      • 1.3.1 Adjective
      • 1.3.2 Noun
    • 1.4 References
  • 2 Dutch
    • 2.1 Etymology
    • 2.2 Noun
    • 2.3 See also
  • 3 Italian
    • 3.1 Etymology
    • 3.2 Noun
  • 4 Spanish
    • 4.1 Noun

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
pony
Wikipedia
New Forest pony (1)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈpəʊni/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈpoʊni/
  • Rhymes: -əʊni

Etymology 1[edit]

1659 from Scots powny, apparently from Middle French poulenet (little foal), ultimately from Late Latin pullanus (young of an animal), from pullus (cognate to English foal). Sense “small serving of alcohol” from 19th century, both for small sizes generally and for a quarter pint specifically, from the small size.[1]

Noun[edit]

pony (plural ponies)

  1. Any of several small breeds of horse under 14.2 hands.
  2. (regional) A small serving of an alcoholic beverage, especially beer.
    • 1879, “Some Queer Interviews: Interview with a Pony of Beer”, Puck, Vol. 5–6, p. 435
    • 1885, New York Journal, August:[2]
      ‘I’m on the inside track,’ said a pony of beer as it went galloping down a man’s throat.
    • 1969, Vladimir Nabokov, Ada or Ardor, Penguin 2011, p. 193:
      Demon popped into his mouth a last morsel of black bread with elastic samlet, gulped down a last pony of vodka and took his place at the table with Marina facing him across its oblong length.
    • 2010, Dick Lynas, Pies Were for Thursdays: Tales from an Ordinary Glasgow East End Childhood, page 283,
      I did not even know what a ‘pony’, a small chaser of beer, was. But of course I could not admit that. So putting on an air of nonchalance, and a deep voice, I strolled into a pub with one of the other equally naive guys and we ordered two ponies of beer.
      ‘McEwans?’ asked the barman.
      ‘Naw - ponies’ said I.
  3. (Australia, New South Wales, Victoria) A serving of 140 millilitres of beer (formerly 5 fl oz); a quarter pint.
  4. (Britain, slang) Twenty-five pounds sterling.
  5. (US, slang) A translation used as a study aid; loosely, a crib, a cheat-sheet.
    • 1931, William Faulkner, Sanctuary, Library of America, 1985, p.104:
      She kept the dates written down in her Latin 'pony', so she didn't have to bother about who it was.
Synonyms[edit]
  • horseling
Derived terms[edit]
  • dog and pony show
  • play the ponies
  • polo pony
  • pony and trap
  • pony chaise
  • pony engine
  • pony express
  • pony glass
  • pony keg
  • pony truck
  • pony truss
  • pony up
  • Shetland pony
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

pony (third-person singular simple present ponies, present participle ponying, simple past and past participle ponied)

  1. (transitive) To lead (a horse) from another horse.

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of pony and trap, rhyming with crap.

Adjective[edit]

pony (comparative ponier, superlative poniest)

  1. (Cockney rhyming slang) Of little worth.

Noun[edit]

pony (plural ponies)

  1. (Cockney rhyming slang) Crap; rubbish, nonsense.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Notes and Queries, August 8th, 1896, p. 126: “It seems probable the origin is due to the diminutiveness of the glass;”
    “The expression ‘a pony of beer’ is often used in South Wales for a small glass containing about the fourth of a pint.”
  2. ^ Americanisms, Farmer, p. 430

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English pony.

Noun[edit]

pony m (plural pony's, diminutive pony'tje n)

  1. pony, small horse
  2. (by extension) hairstyle with a fringe/bangs

See also[edit]

  • paard

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English pony.

Noun[edit]

pony m (invariable)

  1. pony (young horse)
  2. pony express

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pony m (plural ponys)

  1. pony