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1 : In an ample manner.

2 : A genus of marine mollusks of the order Tectibranchiata; the sea hare. Some of the species when disturbed throw out a deep purple liquor, which colors the water to some distance. See Illust. in Appendix.

3 : To apply or address one's self; to give application; to attend closely (to).

4 : To ply; to move.

5 : To make request; to have recourse with a view to gain something; to make application. (to); to solicit; as, to apply to a friend for information.

6 : To suit; to agree; to have some connection, agreement, or analogy; as, this argument applies well to the case.

7 : To visit.

8 : To busy; to keep at work; to ply.

9 : To betake; to address; to refer; -- used reflexively.

10 : To direct or address.

11 : To fix closely; to engage and employ diligently, or with attention; to attach; to incline.

12 : To make use of, declare, or pronounce, as suitable, fitting, or relative; as, to apply the testimony to the case; to apply an epithet to a person.

13 : To put to use; to use or employ for a particular purpose, or in a particular case; to appropriate; to devote; as, to apply money to the payment of a debt.

14 : To lay or place; to put or adjust (one thing to another); -- with to; as, to apply the hand to the breast; to apply medicaments to a diseased part of the body.

15 : of Apply

16 : In the manner of a bishop.

17 : Bishoplike; episcopal.

18 : At a small price; at a low value; in a common or inferior manner.

19 : To infold; to embrace.

20 : To fulfill; to accomplish.

21 : To be ceremoniously courteous; to make one's compliments.

22 : To yield assent; to accord; agree, or acquiesce; to adapt one's self; to consent or conform; -- usually followed by with.

23 : of Comply

24 : Lame; disabled; in a crippled condition.

25 : In a crisp manner.

26 : With profound skill; with art or intricacy; as, a deeply laid plot or intrigue.

27 : Gravely; with low or deep tone; as, a deeply toned instrument.

28 : Very; with a tendency to darkness of color.

29 : Profoundly; thoroughly; not superficially; in a high degree; intensely; as, deeply skilled in ethics.

30 : At or to a great depth; far below the surface; as, to sink deeply.

31 : Full of dimples, or small depressions; dimpled; as, the dimply pool.

32 : By hap, chance, luck, or accident; perhaps; it may be.

(32) words is found which contain ply in our database

For ply word found data is following....

1 : Amply

adv.

In an ample manner.

2 : Aplysia

n.

A genus of marine mollusks of the order Tectibranchiata; the sea hare. Some of the species when disturbed throw out a deep purple liquor, which colors the water to some distance. See Illust. in Appendix.

3 : Apply

v. i.

To apply or address one's self; to give application; to attend closely (to).

4 : Apply

v. i.

To ply; to move.

5 : Apply

v. i.

To make request; to have recourse with a view to gain something; to make application. (to); to solicit; as, to apply to a friend for information.

6 : Apply

v. i.

To suit; to agree; to have some connection, agreement, or analogy; as, this argument applies well to the case.

7 : Apply

v. t.

To visit.

8 : Apply

v. t.

To busy; to keep at work; to ply.

9 : Apply

v. t.

To betake; to address; to refer; -- used reflexively.

10 : Apply

v. t.

To direct or address.

11 : Apply

v. t.

To fix closely; to engage and employ diligently, or with attention; to attach; to incline.

12 : Apply

v. t.

To make use of, declare, or pronounce, as suitable, fitting, or relative; as, to apply the testimony to the case; to apply an epithet to a person.

13 : Apply

v. t.

To put to use; to use or employ for a particular purpose, or in a particular case; to appropriate; to devote; as, to apply money to the payment of a debt.

14 : Apply

v. t.

To lay or place; to put or adjust (one thing to another); -- with to; as, to apply the hand to the breast; to apply medicaments to a diseased part of the body.

15 : Applying

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Apply

16 : Bishoply

adv.

In the manner of a bishop.

17 : Bishoply

a.

Bishoplike; episcopal.

18 : Cheaply

adv.

At a small price; at a low value; in a common or inferior manner.

19 : Comply

v. i.

To infold; to embrace.

20 : Comply

v. i.

To fulfill; to accomplish.

21 : Comply

v. i.

To be ceremoniously courteous; to make one's compliments.

22 : Comply

v. i.

To yield assent; to accord; agree, or acquiesce; to adapt one's self; to consent or conform; -- usually followed by with.

23 : Complying

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Comply

24 : Cripply

a.

Lame; disabled; in a crippled condition.

25 : Crisply

adv.

In a crisp manner.

26 : Deeply

adv.

With profound skill; with art or intricacy; as, a deeply laid plot or intrigue.

27 : Deeply

adv.

Gravely; with low or deep tone; as, a deeply toned instrument.

28 : Deeply

adv.

Very; with a tendency to darkness of color.

29 : Deeply

adv.

Profoundly; thoroughly; not superficially; in a high degree; intensely; as, deeply skilled in ethics.

30 : Deeply

adv.

At or to a great depth; far below the surface; as, to sink deeply.

31 : Dimply

a.

Full of dimples, or small depressions; dimpled; as, the dimply pool.

32 : Haply

adv.

By hap, chance, luck, or accident; perhaps; it may be.

This word ply uses (3) total characters with white space

This word ply uses (3) total characters with white out space

This word ply uses 3 unique characters: L P Y

Number of all permutations npr for ply word is (6)

Number of all combination ncr for ply word is (6)

2 same character containing word for ply

3 same character containing word For ply

All permutations word for ply

All combinations word for ply

All similar letter combinations related to ply

From Wikipedia

Ply, Pli, Plies or Plying may refer to:

  • Ply (game theory), a turn in game play
  • PLY (file format) or Polygon File Format
  • Plying, a spinning technique to make yarn
  • Plies (rapper), American rapper
  • Pli, an academic journal
  • Ply (layer), typically of paper or wood
    • Tire ply, a layer of cords embedded in the rubber of a tire
    • Plywood, made of layers of wood
  • PLY, a parsing tool for Python
  • Plymouth railway station, England, station code

From Wiktionary

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Pronunciation
    • 1.2 Etymology 1
      • 1.2.1 Noun
      • 1.2.2 Translations
        • 1.2.2.1 Derived terms
    • 1.3 Etymology 2
      • 1.3.1 Verb
        • 1.3.1.1 Derived terms
        • 1.3.1.2 Translations
    • 1.4 Etymology 3
      • 1.4.1 Verb
        • 1.4.1.1 Translations

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:
ply
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /plaɪ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English, borrowed from Middle French pli (pleat, fold), from plier (bend, fold), from Latin plicō (I fold, I fold together).

Noun[edit]

ply (countable and uncountable, plural plies)

  1. A layer of material.
    two-ply toilet paper
    • 1999, VLSI Design '99
      It is possible to have a very well load balanced partition but with such a high ply that its slowest piece is slower than a not-so-well balanced partition with less ply.
  2. A strand that, twisted together with other strands, makes up yarn or rope.
  3. (colloquial) Plywood.
  4. (artificial intelligence, game theory) In two-player sequential games, a "half-turn", or one move made by one of the players.
    He proposed to build Deep Purple, a super-computer capable of 24-ply look-ahead for chess.
  5. (now chiefly Scotland) State, condition.
    • 1749, John Cleland, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure, Penguin 1985, p. 66:
      You may be sure, in the ply I was now taking, I had no objection to the proposal, and was rather a-tiptoe for its accomplishment.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]
  • plywood

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English plien (bend, fold, mold), borrowed from Middle French plier (bend, fold), see Etymology 1.

Verb[edit]

ply (third-person singular simple present plies, present participle plying, simple past and past participle plied)

  1. (transitive) To bend; to fold.
  2. (intransitive) To flex.
    • 1669, Roger L’Estrange, Fables, of Æsop and other Eminent Mythologists, London: R. Sare et al., 3rd edition, “An Oak and a Willow,” p. 195,[1]
      The Willow Ply’d, and gave way to the Gust, and still recover’d it self again, without receiving any Damage []
Derived terms[edit]
  • plier (agent noun)
  • pliers
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English plien, short for applien (apply)

Verb[edit]

ply (third-person singular simple present plies, present participle plying, simple past and past participle plied)

  1. (transitive) To work at diligently.
    He plied his trade as carpenter for forty-three years.
    • 1595, George Peele, The Old Wives’ Tale, The Malone Society Reprints, 1908, line 720,[2]
      Ply you your work or else you are like to smart.
    • 1666, Edmund Waller, Instructions to the Painter for the Drawing of the Posture & Progress of His Majesties Forces at Sea, London: Henry Herringman, p. 13,[3]
      Their bloody Task, unwearied, still they ply,
      Only restrain’d by Death, or Victory:
  2. (intransitive) To work diligently.
    • 1644, John Milton, Of Education, London: Thomas Underhill, p. 4,[4]
      Ere halfe these Authors be read, which will soon be with plying hard and dayly, they cannot choose but be masters of any ordinary prose.
    • 1711, Joseph Addison and Richard Steele, The Spectator, Volume 2, Number 94, 18 June, 1711,[5]
      He was afterwards reduced to great Want, and forced to think of plying in the Streets as a Porter for his Livelihood.
  3. (transitive) To use vigorously.
    He plied his ax with bloody results.
  4. (transitive) To travel over regularly.
    ply the seven seas
    A steamer plies between certain ports.
  5. (transitive) To persist in offering something to.
    to ply someone with drink
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, Volume 2, Book 8, Chapter 12, p. 162,[6]
      [] the true Gamesters pretended to be ill, and refused their Glass, while they plied heartily two young Fellows, who were to be afterwards pillaged, as indeed they were without Mercy.
    • 1929, M. Barnard Eldershaw, A House Is Built, Chapter VII, Section vi
      Esther began [] to cry. But when the fire had been lit specially to warm her chilled limbs and Adela had plied her with hot negus she began to feel rather a heroine.
  6. (transitive) To press upon; to urge importunately.
    to ply someone with questions, with solicitations
    • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act III, Scene 2,[7]
      He plies the duke at morning and at night,
  7. (transitive) To employ diligently; to use steadily.
    • c. 1593, William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew, Act II, Scene 1,[8]
      Go ply thy needle; meddle not with her.
  8. (nautical) To work to windward; to beat.
Translations[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for ply in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)