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1 : The expected king and deliverer of the Hebrews; the Savior; Christ.

2 : The state or office of the Messiah.

(2) words is found which contain messiah in our database

For messiah word found data is following....

1 : Messiah

n.

The expected king and deliverer of the Hebrews; the Savior; Christ.

2 : Messiahship

n.

The state or office of the Messiah.

This word messiah uses (7) total characters with white space

This word messiah uses (7) total characters with white out space

This word messiah uses 6 unique characters: A E H I M S

Number of all permutations npr for messiah word is (720)

Number of all combination ncr for messiah word is (720)

Similar matching soundex word for messiah

2 same character containing word for messiah

3 same character containing word For messiah

All permutations word for messiah

All combinations word for messiah

All similar letter combinations related to messiah

From Wikipedia

Samuel anoints David, Dura Europos, Syria, Date: 3rd century CE.

In Abrahamic religions, the Messiah (Hebrew: מָשִׁיחַ‎, translit. māšîaḥ‎, sometimes spelled Moshiach), is the one chosen to lead the world and save it. The term also appears in the forms Messias (Ancient Greek: Μεσσίας, translit. Messias), Christ (Ancient Greek: Χριστός, translit. Khristós), or Al-Masih (Arabic: المسيح‎, ISO 233: al-masīḥ).

The concepts of the Messiah, messianism, and the Messianic Age grew from the Book of Isaiah (4:2 and chapter 11) during the latter half of the 8th century BCE.[1][2] The term comes from the Hebrew word for anointed one. In the Hebrew Bible, Israel's kings were sometimes called God's "messiah"—God's anointed one.[3] A messiah could also be an anointed high priest or prophet. An anointed individual in general did not necessarily need to descend from Jacob, as the Hebrew Bible refers to Cyrus the Great, king of Persia, as annointed[4] for his decree to rebuild the Jerusalem Temple.

In Judaism, the Messiah (הַמָּשִׁיחַ‎, HaMashiach, "the anointed one"),[5] often referred to as "King Messiah" (מלך המשיח‎, Melekh HaMashiach),[6] is expected to descend from King David and accomplish the unification of the twelve tribes[7] into a re-established nation. The Jerusalem Temple's rebuilding will usher in a Messianic Age[8] of global peace.[9][10]

In Christianity, the Messiah is called the Christ, from Ancient Greek: χριστός, translit. khristós, translating the Hebrew word of the same meaning.[11] Unlike Judaism and Islam, the Messiah in Christianity is the Son of God, as Lord and Savior. Christ became the accepted Christian designation and title of Jesus of Nazareth,[12] because Christians believe that messianic prophecies in the Christian Old Testament were fulfilled in his mission, death, and resurrection. Christians believe that Jesus will fulfill the rest of the Messianic prophecies in the Second Coming, to usher in a Messianic Age or a permanent World to Come.

In Islam, Jesus was a Prophet and the Masîḥ (مسيح), the Messiah in Islam, sent to the Israelites, and will return to Earth at the end of times, along with the Mahdi, and defeat al-Masih ad-Dajjal.[13]

In Ahmadiyya theology, these prophecies concerning the Mahdi and the second coming of Jesus have been fulfilled in Mirza Ghulam Ahmad (1835–1908),[14] the founder of the Ahmadiyya Movement, and the terms "Messiah" and "Mahdi" are synonyms for one and the same person.[15]

In Chabad messianism,[16] Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn (r. 1920 - 1950), sixth Rebbe (spiritual leader) of Chabad Lubavitch, and Menachem Mendel Schneerson (1902 - 1994), seventh Rebbe of Chabad, are Messiah claimants, though neither ever claimed to be the messiah themselves and often vehemently denied claims that they were the messiah.[17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25] Resembling early Christianity, the deceased Menachem Mendel Schneerson is believed to be the Messiah among some adherents of the Chabad movement; his second coming is believed to be imminent.[26][27][28][29]

  1. ^ Ginsberg, HL, "Encyclopedia Judaica: Messiah," *Jewish Virtual Library*(2008; The Gale Group). Accessed at https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/messiah on 2/13/17.
  2. ^ Potok, C (ed), "P'shat Commentary," *Etz Hayim* (2001; The Rabbinical Assembly), 838 & Kushner, H (ed), "D'rash Commentary," 45.
  3. ^ Wright, Robert (June 2009). The Evolution of God (1st ed.). New York, NY: Little, Brown, and Company. p. 247. ISBN 978-0-316-73491-2. 
  4. ^ Jewish Encyclopedia: Cyrus: Cyrus and the Jews: "This prophet, Cyrus, through whom were to be redeemed His chosen people, whom he would glorify before all the world, was the promised Messiah, 'the shepherd of Yhwh' (xliv. 28, xlv. 1)."
  5. ^ Telushkin, Joseph. "The Messiah". The Jewish Virtual Library Jewish Literacy. NY: William Morrow and Co., 1991. Reprinted by permission of the author. Retrieved 2 December 2012. 
  6. ^ Flusser, David. "Second Temple Period". Messiah. Encyclopaedia Judaica 2008 The Gale Group. Retrieved 2 December 2012. 
  7. ^ Megillah 17b–18a, Taanit 8b
  8. ^ Sotah 9a
  9. ^ Schochet, Rabbi Prof. Dr. Jacob Immanuel. "Moshiach ben Yossef". Tutorial. moshiach.com. Retrieved 2 December 2012. 
  10. ^ Blidstein, Prof. Dr. Gerald J. "Messiah in Rabbinic Thought". MESSIAH. Jewish Virtual Library and Encyclopaedia Judaica 2008 The Gale Group. Retrieved 2 December 2012. 
  11. ^ Etymology Online
  12. ^ Jesus of Nazareth, the central figure of Christianity.
  13. ^ "Muttaqun OnLine - Dajjal (The Anti-Christ): According to Quran and Sunnah". Muttaqun.com. Retrieved 9 November 2012. 
  14. ^ Cite error: The named reference askislamorg was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  15. ^ Cite error: The named reference rororg was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  16. ^ also: Habad messianism, Lubavitcher messianism, mishichism, meshichism.
  17. ^ Cite error: The named reference SHandelman was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  18. ^ Cite error: The named reference ASteinsaltz was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  19. ^ Cite error: The named reference DHorn was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  20. ^ Cite error: The named reference ALichtenstein was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  21. ^ Cite error: The named reference NYT-Agudas_Chasidei_Chabad was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  22. ^ Cite error: The named reference vosiz was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  23. ^ Cite error: The named reference TBMag was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  24. ^ Cite error: The named reference RAFeldman was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  25. ^ Cite error: The named reference DBerger-TRtMatSoOI was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  26. ^ Cite error: The named reference DVED-250 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  27. ^ Cite error: The named reference ChFr was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  28. ^ Cite error: The named reference LubavitcherFalseMessiahs was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  29. ^ Cite error: The named reference MS-HabadMinuth was invoked but never defined (see the help page).

From Wiktionary

See also: Messiah

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Etymology
    • 1.2 Pronunciation
    • 1.3 Noun
      • 1.3.1 Related terms
      • 1.3.2 Translations
    • 1.4 Anagrams

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Messias, from Hellenistic Ancient Greek Μεσσίας (Messías), from Aramaic משיחא‏ (məšīḥā), from Biblical Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ‏ (māšîaḥ, anointed).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: mə-sī'ə, IPA(key): /məˈsaɪ.ə/

Noun[edit]

messiah (plural messiahs)

  1. (Abrahamic tradition) The one who is ordained by God to lead the people of Israel, believed by Christians to be Jesus Christ.
  2. An extremely powerful divine figure.

Related terms[edit]

  • messianic
  • Christ

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Anagrams[edit]

  • mashies, sameish, smashie