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1 : See Alms.

2 : Amice, a hood or cape. See 2d Amice.

3 : A reveling; a rioting.

4 : See Kirmess.

5 : In Europe, particularly in Belgium and Holland, and outdoor festival and fair; in the United States, generally an indoor entertainment and fair combined.

6 : A disagreeable mixture or confusion of things; hence, a situation resulting from blundering or from misunderstanding; as, he made a mess of it.

7 : The milk given by a cow at one milking.

8 : A set of four; -- from the old practice of dividing companies into sets of four at dinner.

9 : A number of persons who eat together, and for whom food is prepared in common; especially, persons in the military or naval service who eat at the same table; as, the wardroom mess.

10 : A quantity of food set on a table at one time; provision of food for a person or party for one meal; as, a mess of pottage; also, the food given to a beast at one time.

11 : Mass; church service.

12 : To supply with a mess.

13 : To take meals with a mess; to belong to a mess; to eat (with others); as, I mess with the wardroom officers.

14 : A messenger.

15 : To bear as a message.

16 : Hence, specifically, an official communication, not made in person, but delivered by a messenger; as, the President's message.

17 : Any notice, word, or communication, written or verbal, sent from one person to another.

18 : A messenger.

19 : of Mess

20 : of Monseigneur

21 : A person appointed to perform certain ministerial duties under bankrupt and insolvent laws, such as to take charge og the estate of the bankrupt or insolvent.

22 : A hawser passed round the capstan, and having its two ends lashed together to form an endless rope or chain; -- formerly used for heaving in the cable.

23 : One who, or that which, foreshows, or foretells.

24 : One who bears a message; the bearer of a verbal or written communication, notice, or invitation, from one person to another, or to a public body; specifically, an office servant who bears messages.

25 : A dog.

26 : A German epic poem on the Messiah, by Klopstock.

27 : The expected king and deliverer of the Hebrews; the Savior; Christ.

28 : The state or office of the Messiah.

29 : Of or relating to the Messiah; as, the Messianic office or character.

30 : The Messiah.

31 : The tenth month of the French republican calendar dating from September 22, 1792. It began June 19, and ended July 18. See VendEmiaire.

32 : of Monsieur

33 : Sirs; gentlemen; -- abbreviated to Messrs., which is used as the plural of Mr.

34 : Of or pertaining to Messina, or its inhabitans.

35 : of Mess

36 : An associate in a mess.

37 : of Monsieur

38 : A dwelling house, with the adjacent buildings and curtilage, and the adjoining lands appropriated to the use of the household.

(38) words is found which contain mess in our database

For mess word found data is following....

1 : Almesse

n.

See Alms.

2 : Amess

n.

Amice, a hood or cape. See 2d Amice.

3 : Comessation

n.

A reveling; a rioting.

4 : Kermesse

n.

See Kirmess.

5 : Kirmess

n.

In Europe, particularly in Belgium and Holland, and outdoor festival and fair; in the United States, generally an indoor entertainment and fair combined.

6 : Mess

n.

A disagreeable mixture or confusion of things; hence, a situation resulting from blundering or from misunderstanding; as, he made a mess of it.

7 : Mess

n.

The milk given by a cow at one milking.

8 : Mess

n.

A set of four; -- from the old practice of dividing companies into sets of four at dinner.

9 : Mess

n.

A number of persons who eat together, and for whom food is prepared in common; especially, persons in the military or naval service who eat at the same table; as, the wardroom mess.

10 : Mess

n.

A quantity of food set on a table at one time; provision of food for a person or party for one meal; as, a mess of pottage; also, the food given to a beast at one time.

11 : Mess

n.

Mass; church service.

12 : Mess

v. t.

To supply with a mess.

13 : Mess

v. i.

To take meals with a mess; to belong to a mess; to eat (with others); as, I mess with the wardroom officers.

14 : Message

n.

A messenger.

15 : Message

v. t.

To bear as a message.

16 : Message

n.

Hence, specifically, an official communication, not made in person, but delivered by a messenger; as, the President's message.

17 : Message

n.

Any notice, word, or communication, written or verbal, sent from one person to another.

18 : Messager

n.

A messenger.

19 : Messed

imp. & p. p.

of Mess

20 : Messeigneurs

pl.

of Monseigneur

21 : Messenger

n.

A person appointed to perform certain ministerial duties under bankrupt and insolvent laws, such as to take charge og the estate of the bankrupt or insolvent.

22 : Messenger

n.

A hawser passed round the capstan, and having its two ends lashed together to form an endless rope or chain; -- formerly used for heaving in the cable.

23 : Messenger

n.

One who, or that which, foreshows, or foretells.

24 : Messenger

n.

One who bears a message; the bearer of a verbal or written communication, notice, or invitation, from one person to another, or to a public body; specifically, an office servant who bears messages.

25 : Messet

n.

A dog.

26 : Messiad

n.

A German epic poem on the Messiah, by Klopstock.

27 : Messiah

n.

The expected king and deliverer of the Hebrews; the Savior; Christ.

28 : Messiahship

n.

The state or office of the Messiah.

29 : Messianic

a.

Of or relating to the Messiah; as, the Messianic office or character.

30 : Messias

n.

The Messiah.

31 : Messidor

n.

The tenth month of the French republican calendar dating from September 22, 1792. It began June 19, and ended July 18. See VendEmiaire.

32 : Messieurs

pl.

of Monsieur

33 : Messieurs

n. pl.

Sirs; gentlemen; -- abbreviated to Messrs., which is used as the plural of Mr.

34 : Messinese

a.

Of or pertaining to Messina, or its inhabitans.

35 : Messing

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Mess

36 : Messmate

n.

An associate in a mess.

37 : Messrs.

pl.

of Monsieur

38 : Messuage

n.

A dwelling house, with the adjacent buildings and curtilage, and the adjoining lands appropriated to the use of the household.

This word mess uses (4) total characters with white space

This word mess uses (4) total characters with white out space

This word mess uses 3 unique characters: E M S

Number of all permutations npr for mess word is (6)

Number of all combination ncr for mess word is (6)

Similar matching soundex word for mess

2 same character containing word for mess

3 same character containing word For mess

4 same character containing word For mess

All permutations word for mess

All combinations word for mess

All similar letter combinations related to mess

From Wikipedia

A mess or mess hall (also called a messdeck aboard ships) is an area where military personnel socialize, eat, and (in some cases) live. In some societies this military usage has extended to other disciplined services eateries such as civilian fire fighting and police forces. The root of mess is the Old French mes, "portion of food" (cf. modern French mets), drawn from the Latin verb mittere, meaning "to send" and "to put" (cf. modern French mettre), the original sense being "a course of a meal put on the table"; cfr. also the modern Italian portata with the same meaning, past participle of portare, to bring. This sense of mess, which appeared in English in the 13th century, was often used for cooked or liquid dishes in particular, as in the "mess of pottage" (porridge or soup).

From Wiktionary

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Pronunciation
    • 1.2 Etymology 1
      • 1.2.1 Noun
        • 1.2.1.1 Translations
        • 1.2.1.2 Derived terms
        • 1.2.1.3 Further reading
      • 1.2.2 Verb
      • 1.2.3 Further reading
    • 1.3 Etymology 2
      • 1.3.1 Noun
        • 1.3.1.1 Quotations
        • 1.3.1.2 Synonyms
        • 1.3.1.3 Translations
      • 1.3.2 Verb
        • 1.3.2.1 Derived terms
    • 1.4 Further reading
    • 1.5 References
    • 1.6 Anagrams
  • 2 Manx
    • 2.1 Etymology
    • 2.2 Pronunciation
    • 2.3 Noun
      • 2.3.1 Derived terms
    • 2.4 Mutation
  • 3 Vilamovian
    • 3.1 Noun
      • 3.1.1 Related terms

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:
mess
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /mɛs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛs

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English mes, partly from Old English mēse, mēose (table; that which is on a table; dish, food; meal, dinner; see mese); and partly from Old French mes, Late Latin missum, from mittere (to put, place) (e.g. on the table), Latin mittere (to send). See mission, and compare Mass (religious service). More at mese; see also mease.

Noun[edit]

mess (plural messes)

  1. (obsolete) Mass; a church service.
  2. (archaic) A quantity of food set on a table at one time; provision of food for a person or party for one meal; also, the food given to an animal at one time.
    A mess of pottage.
    • Milton
      At their savoury dinner set / Of herbs and other country messes.
  3. A number of persons who eat together, and for whom food is prepared in common, especially military personnel who eat at the same table.
    the wardroom mess
    • 1610, William Shakespeare, The Winter's Tale, IV. iv. 11:
      But that our feasts / In every mess have folly, and the feeders / Digest it with accustom,
  4. A set of four (from the old practice of dividing companies into sets of four at dinner).
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Latimer to this entry?)
  5. (US) The milk given by a cow at one milking.
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Further reading[edit]
  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Mess (military) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Verb[edit]

mess (third-person singular simple present messes, present participle messing, simple past and past participle messed)

  1. (intransitive) To take meals with a mess.
  2. (intransitive) To belong to a mess.
  3. (intransitive) To eat (with others).
    I mess with the wardroom officers.
  4. (transitive) To supply with a mess.

Further reading[edit]

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Mess (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2[edit]

Perhaps a corruption of Middle English mesh (for mash), compare muss, or derived from Etymology 1 "mixed foods, as for animals".

Noun[edit]

mess (uncountable)

  1. A disagreeable mixture or confusion of things; hence, a situation resulting from blundering or from misunderstanding; a disorder.
    He made a mess of it.
    My bedroom is such a mess, I need to tidy up.
  2. (colloquial) A large quantity or number.
    My boss dumped a whole mess of projects on my desk today.
    She brought back a mess of fish to fix for supper.
  3. (euphemistic) Excrement.
    There was dog mess all along the street.
    Parked under a tree, my car was soon covered in birds' mess.
Quotations[edit]
  • For usage examples of this term, see Citations:mess.
Synonyms[edit]
  • see also Wikisaurus:disorder
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

mess (third-person singular simple present messes, present participle messing, simple past and past participle messed)

  1. (transitive) To make a mess of.
  2. (transitive) To throw into confusion.
    • Scribner's Magazine
      It wasn't right either to be messing another man's sleep.
  3. (intransitive) To interfere.
    This doesn't concern you. Don't mess.
Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Mess (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References[edit]

  • mess in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

Anagrams[edit]

  • MSEs, Mses, Mses., SEMs

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish mes.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /meːs/

Noun[edit]

mess m (genitive singular mess, plural messyn)

  1. (botany) fruit

Derived terms[edit]

  • messghart

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
RadicalLenitionEclipsis
messvessunchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Vilamovian[edit]

Noun[edit]

mess n

  1. brass

Related terms[edit]

  • messera