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1 : An antimask.

2 : A secondary mask, or grotesque interlude, between the parts of a serious mask.

3 : To mask; to conceal.

4 : A rustic dance, so called in ridicule of the people of Bergamo, in Italy, once noted for their clownishness.

5 : Having the color of the damask rose.

6 : Pertaining to, or originating at, the city of Damascus; resembling the products or manufactures of Damascus.

7 : A deep pink or rose color.

8 : Damask or Damascus steel; also, the peculiar markings or "water" of such steel.

9 : A heavy woolen or worsted stuff with a pattern woven in the same way as the linen damask; -- made for furniture covering and hangings.

10 : Linen so woven that a pattern in produced by the different directions of the thread, without contrast of color.

11 : Damask silk; silk woven with an elaborate pattern of flowers and the like.

12 : To decorate in a way peculiar to Damascus or attributed to Damascus; particularly: (a) with flowers and rich designs, as silk; (b) with inlaid lines of gold, etc., or with a peculiar marking or "water," as metal. See Damaskeen.

13 : of Damask

14 : Alt. of Damasken

15 : To decorate, as iron, steel, etc., with a peculiar marking or "water" produced in the process of manufacture, or with designs produced by inlaying or incrusting with another metal, as silver or gold, or by etching, etc., to damask.

16 : A sword of Damask steel.

17 : of Damask

18 : To divest of a mask.

19 : To cover, as with a mask; to disguise or conceal.

20 : The lower lip of the larva of a dragon fly, modified so as to form a prehensile organ.

21 : A screen for a battery.

22 : In a permanent fortification, a redoubt which protects the caponiere.

23 : A grotesque head or face, used to adorn keystones and other prominent parts, to spout water in fountains, and the like; -- called also mascaron.

24 : A dramatic performance, formerly in vogue, in which the actors wore masks and represented mythical or allegorical characters.

25 : A festive entertainment of dancing or other diversions, where all wear masks; a masquerade; hence, a revel; a frolic; a delusive show.

26 : That which disguises; a pretext or subterfuge.

27 : A cover, or partial cover, for the face, used for disguise or protection; as, a dancer's mask; a fencer's mask; a ball player's mask.

28 : To wear a mask; to be disguised in any way.

29 : To take part as a masker in a masquerade.

30 : To cover or keep in check; as, to mask a body of troops or a fortess by a superior force, while some hostile evolution is being carried out.

31 : To conceal; also, to intervene in the line of.

32 : To disguise; to cover; to hide.

33 : To cover, as the face, by way of concealment or defense against injury; to conceal with a mask or visor.

34 : Any spiral marine shell of the genus Persona, having a curiously twisted aperture.

35 : of Mask

36 : Having the anterior part of the head differing decidedly in color from the rest of the plumage; -- said of birds.

37 : Same as Personate.

38 : Wearing a mask or masks; characterized by masks; cincealed; hidden.

39 : To confuse; to stupefy.

40 : One who wears a mask; one who appears in disguise at a masquerade.

41 : The dress or disguise of a maske/; masquerade.

42 : of Mask

43 : The muskellunge.

44 : To put off a mask.

45 : To strip of a mask or disguise; to lay open; to expose.

(45) words is found which contain mask in our database

For mask word found data is following....

1 : Antic-mask

n.

An antimask.

2 : Antimask

n.

A secondary mask, or grotesque interlude, between the parts of a serious mask.

3 : Bemask

v. t.

To mask; to conceal.

4 : Bergomask

n.

A rustic dance, so called in ridicule of the people of Bergamo, in Italy, once noted for their clownishness.

5 : Damask

a.

Having the color of the damask rose.

6 : Damask

a.

Pertaining to, or originating at, the city of Damascus; resembling the products or manufactures of Damascus.

7 : Damask

n.

A deep pink or rose color.

8 : Damask

n.

Damask or Damascus steel; also, the peculiar markings or "water" of such steel.

9 : Damask

n.

A heavy woolen or worsted stuff with a pattern woven in the same way as the linen damask; -- made for furniture covering and hangings.

10 : Damask

n.

Linen so woven that a pattern in produced by the different directions of the thread, without contrast of color.

11 : Damask

n.

Damask silk; silk woven with an elaborate pattern of flowers and the like.

12 : Damask

v. t.

To decorate in a way peculiar to Damascus or attributed to Damascus; particularly: (a) with flowers and rich designs, as silk; (b) with inlaid lines of gold, etc., or with a peculiar marking or "water," as metal. See Damaskeen.

13 : Damasked

imp. & p. p.

of Damask

14 : Damaskeen

v.

Alt. of Damasken

15 : Damasken

v.

To decorate, as iron, steel, etc., with a peculiar marking or "water" produced in the process of manufacture, or with designs produced by inlaying or incrusting with another metal, as silver or gold, or by etching, etc., to damask.

16 : Damaskin

n.

A sword of Damask steel.

17 : Damasking

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Damask

18 : Dismask

v. t.

To divest of a mask.

19 : Immask

v. t.

To cover, as with a mask; to disguise or conceal.

20 : Mask

n.

The lower lip of the larva of a dragon fly, modified so as to form a prehensile organ.

21 : Mask

n.

A screen for a battery.

22 : Mask

n.

In a permanent fortification, a redoubt which protects the caponiere.

23 : Mask

n.

A grotesque head or face, used to adorn keystones and other prominent parts, to spout water in fountains, and the like; -- called also mascaron.

24 : Mask

n.

A dramatic performance, formerly in vogue, in which the actors wore masks and represented mythical or allegorical characters.

25 : Mask

n.

A festive entertainment of dancing or other diversions, where all wear masks; a masquerade; hence, a revel; a frolic; a delusive show.

26 : Mask

n.

That which disguises; a pretext or subterfuge.

27 : Mask

n.

A cover, or partial cover, for the face, used for disguise or protection; as, a dancer's mask; a fencer's mask; a ball player's mask.

28 : Mask

v. i.

To wear a mask; to be disguised in any way.

29 : Mask

v. i.

To take part as a masker in a masquerade.

30 : Mask

v. t.

To cover or keep in check; as, to mask a body of troops or a fortess by a superior force, while some hostile evolution is being carried out.

31 : Mask

v. t.

To conceal; also, to intervene in the line of.

32 : Mask

v. t.

To disguise; to cover; to hide.

33 : Mask

v. t.

To cover, as the face, by way of concealment or defense against injury; to conceal with a mask or visor.

34 : Mask shell

Any spiral marine shell of the genus Persona, having a curiously twisted aperture.

35 : Masked

imp. & p. p.

of Mask

36 : Masked

a.

Having the anterior part of the head differing decidedly in color from the rest of the plumage; -- said of birds.

37 : Masked

a.

Same as Personate.

38 : Masked

a.

Wearing a mask or masks; characterized by masks; cincealed; hidden.

39 : Masker

v. t.

To confuse; to stupefy.

40 : Masker

n.

One who wears a mask; one who appears in disguise at a masquerade.

41 : Maskery

n.

The dress or disguise of a maske/; masquerade.

42 : Masking

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Mask

43 : Maskinonge

n.

The muskellunge.

44 : Unmask

v. i.

To put off a mask.

45 : Unmask

v. t.

To strip of a mask or disguise; to lay open; to expose.

This word mask uses (4) total characters with white space

This word mask uses (4) total characters with white out space

This word mask uses 4 unique characters: A K M S

Number of all permutations npr for mask word is (24)

Number of all combination ncr for mask word is (24)

Similar matching soundex word for mask

2 same character containing word for mask

3 same character containing word For mask

4 same character containing word For mask

All permutations word for mask

All combinations word for mask

All similar letter combinations related to mask

From Wikipedia

This stone mask from the pre-ceramic neolithic period dates to 7000 BC and is probably the oldest mask in the world (Musée de la Bible et de la Terre Sainte)
Papierkrattler masks at the Narrensprung 2005 Carnival parade, Ravensburg, Germany

A mask is an object normally worn on the face, typically for protection, disguise, performance, or entertainment. Masks have been used since antiquity for both ceremonial and practical purposes. They are usually worn on the face, although they may also be positioned for effect elsewhere on the wearer's body. In parts of Australia, giant totem masks cover the body, whilst Inuit women use finger masks during storytelling and dancing.[1]

  1. ^ The Living Tradition of Yup'ik Masks; Anne Feinup-Riordan; University of Washington Press, Seattle, 1996; ISBN 0295975016

From Wiktionary

See also: Mask and mask.

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Pronunciation
    • 1.2 Etymology 1
      • 1.2.1 Alternative forms
      • 1.2.2 Noun
      • 1.2.3 Synonyms
        • 1.2.3.1 Hyponyms
        • 1.2.3.2 Derived terms
        • 1.2.3.3 Translations
      • 1.2.4 Verb
        • 1.2.4.1 Translations
    • 1.3 Etymology 2
      • 1.3.1 Noun
    • 1.4 Etymology 3
      • 1.4.1 Noun
      • 1.4.2 Verb
    • 1.5 Etymology 4
      • 1.5.1 Verb
      • 1.5.2 References
    • 1.6 Anagrams
  • 2 Swedish
    • 2.1 Etymology 1
      • 2.1.1 Pronunciation
      • 2.1.2 Noun
        • 2.1.2.1 Declension
        • 2.1.2.2 Derived terms
    • 2.2 Etymology 2
      • 2.2.1 Pronunciation
      • 2.2.2 Noun
        • 2.2.2.1 Declension
        • 2.2.2.2 Derived terms

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
mask
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

A man wearing a mask
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /mɑːsk/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /mæsk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æsk, -ɑːsk
  • Homophones: masque, masc (some accents)

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French masque (a covering to hide or protect the face), from Italian maschera (mask, disguise), from Medieval Latin masca, mascha, mascus (mask, nightmare, ghost), of uncertain origin. Replaced Old English grīma (mask).

Medieval Latin masca, mascha, mascus may represent the merger of two or more words: 1). a Germanic word from Frankish *maska, mask, mesh (compare Old English mæscre (mesh; discoloration, spot), masc (net, mesh netting); Old High German māsca (mesh, ties)), from Proto-Germanic *maskwǭ (mesh, mask), from Proto-Indo-European *mezgʷ- (to knit, twist), from the practice of wearing mesh netting over the face as a mask to filter air, keeping soot and dust particles from entering the lungs (compare surgical mask, gas mask, etc.); 2). Old French mascurer ("to blacken (the face)"; compare Occitan mascarar, Catalan mascarar, Walloon maxhurer), from a stem *maska, *mask- (black) believed to be of Pre-Indo-European origin giving rise to words meaning "witch, wizard, sorcerer" (compare Old Provençal masco (witch), Occitan masca (witch), French masque (brothel-keeper, witch)); and perhaps another 3). from Arabic مَسْخَرَة‏ (masḵara, buffoon, fool, pleasantry, anything ridiculous), from سَخِرَة‏ (saḵira, to ridicule, to laugh at).

  • Derived from the -r- form: Italian maschera, Spanish and Portuguese máscara, Dutch masker, English masquerade.
  • Derived from the form lacking -r-: German Maske and Swedish mask.[1]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • masque (archaic, noun, verb)

Noun[edit]

mask (plural masks)

  1. A cover, or partial cover, for the face, used for disguise or protection.
    a dancer's mask; a fencer's mask; a ball player's mask
  2. That which disguises; a pretext or subterfuge.
  3. A festive entertainment of dancing or other diversions, where all wear masks; a masquerade
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton:
      This thought might lead me through the world's vain mask.
  4. A person wearing a mask.
    • G. W. Cable
      the mask that has the arm of the Indian queen
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling
      Jones, now taking the mask by the hand, fell to entreating her in the most earnest manner, to acquaint him where he might find Sophia; and when he could obtain no direct answer, he began to upbraid her gently []
  5. (obsolete) A dramatic performance, formerly in vogue, in which the actors wore masks and represented mythical or allegorical characters.
  6. (architecture) A grotesque head or face, used to adorn keystones and other prominent parts, to spout water in fountains, and the like; -- called also mascaron.
  7. (fortification) In a permanent fortification, a redoubt which protects the caponiere.
  8. (fortification) A screen for a battery
  9. (zoology) The lower lip of the larva of a dragonfly, modified so as to form a prehensile organ.
  10. (Puebloan, anthropology) A ceremonial object used in Puebloan kachina cults that resembles a Euro-American masks. (The term is objected as an appropriate translation by Puebloan peoples as it emphasizes imitation but ignores power and representational intent.)
  11. (computing, programming) A pattern of bits used in bitwise operations; bitmask.
  12. (computer graphics) A two-color (black and white) bitmap generated from an image, used to create transparency in the image.
  13. (heraldry) The head of a fox, shown face-on and cut off immediately behind the ears.

Synonyms[edit]

  • vizard (archaic)
Hyponyms[edit]
  • (a cover for the face): domino mask, sleep mask
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

mask (third-person singular simple present masks, present participle masking, simple past and past participle masked)

  1. (transitive) To cover, as the face, by way of concealment or defense against injury; to conceal with a mask or visor.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare, Merry Wives of Windsor, IV,vi:
      They must all be masked and vizarded
  2. (transitive) To disguise; to cover; to hide.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare, Macbeth, III-i:
      Masking the business from the common eye
  3. (transitive, military) To conceal; also, to intervene in the line of.
  4. (transitive, military) To cover or keep in check.
    to mask a body of troops or a fortess by a superior force, while some hostile evolution is being carried out
  5. (intransitive) To take part as a masker in a masquerade
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cavendish to this entry?)
  6. (intransitive) To wear a mask; to be disguised in any way
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  7. (transitive, computing) To set or unset (certain bits, or binary digits, within a value) by means of a bitmask.
    • 1993, Richard E. Haskell, Introduction to computer engineering (page 287)
      That is, the lower nibble (the 4 bits 1010 = A) has been masked to zero. This is because ANDing anything with a zero produces a zero, while ANDing any bit with a 1 leaves the bit unchanged []
  8. (transitive, computing) To disable (an interrupt, etc.) by unsetting the associated bit.
    • 1998, Rick Grehan, ‎Robert Moote, ‎Ingo Cyliax, Real-time programming: a guide to 32-bit embedded development
      When should you mask a specific interrupt, rather than disabling all interrupts?
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English maske, from Old English max, *masc (net), from Proto-Germanic *maskwǭ (mesh, netting, mask), from Proto-Indo-European *mozgʷ-, *mezgʷ- (to knit, tie). Cognate with Dutch maas (mesh), German Masche (mesh), Icelandic möskvi (mesh).

Noun[edit]

mask (plural masks)

  1. A mesh.
  2. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) The mesh of a net; a net; net-bag.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English *mask, masch, from Old English māx, māsc (mash). More at mash.

Noun[edit]

mask (plural masks)

  1. (Britain dialectal) Mash.

Verb[edit]

mask (third-person singular simple present masks, present participle masking, simple past and past participle masked)

  1. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To mash.
  2. (transitive, Britain dialectal) (brewing) To mix malt with hot water to yield wort.
  3. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) To prepare tea in a teapot; alternative to brew.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle English masken, short for *maskeren, malskren (to bewilder; be confused, wander). More at masker.

Verb[edit]

mask (third-person singular simple present masks, present participle masking, simple past and past participle masked)

  1. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To bewilder; confuse.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kluge, Friedrich (1989), Elmar Seebold, editor, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache [Etymological dictionary of the German language] (in German), 22nd edition, ISBN 3-11-006800-1

Anagrams[edit]

  • KAMs, maks

Swedish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Swedish maþker, from Old Norse maðkr. Cognate with English mawk, Danish maddike and Finnish matikka.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

mask c

  1. worm
Declension[edit]
Declension of mask 
SingularPlural
IndefiniteDefiniteIndefiniteDefinite
Nominativemaskmaskenmaskarmaskarna
Genitivemasksmaskensmaskarsmaskarnas
Derived terms[edit]
  • daggmask

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from French masque, from Latin masca. Details: see above, English mask.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

mask c

  1. mask; a cover designed to disguise or protect the face
Declension[edit]
Declension of mask 
SingularPlural
IndefiniteDefiniteIndefiniteDefinite
Nominativemaskmaskenmaskermaskerna
Genitivemasksmaskensmaskersmaskernas
Derived terms[edit]
  • maskera
  • maskerad
  • maskering