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1 : of Countermarch

2 : of Countermarch

3 : To march back, or to march in reversed order.

4 : A marching back; retrocession.

5 : An evolution by which a body of troops change front or reverse the direction of march while retaining the same men in the front rank; also, a movement by which the rear rank becomes the front one, either with or without changing the right to the left.

6 : A change of measures; alteration of conduct.

7 : March; walk; gait.

8 : A chief or ruler of a deme or district in Greece.

9 : To march away.

10 : The third month of the year, containing thirty-one days.

11 : A territorial border or frontier; a region adjacent to a boundary line; a confine; -- used chiefly in the plural, and in English history applied especially to the border land on the frontiers between England and Scotland, and England and Wales.

12 : To border; to be contiguous; to lie side by side.

13 : of March

14 : of March

15 : To move with regular steps, as a soldier; to walk in a grave, deliberate, or stately manner; to advance steadily.

16 : To proceed by walking in a body or in military order; as, the German army marched into France.

17 : TO cause to move with regular steps in the manner of a soldier; to cause to move in military array, or in a body, as troops; to cause to advance in a steady, regular, or stately manner; to cause to go by peremptory command, or by force.

18 : The act of marching; a movement of soldiers from one stopping place to another; military progress; advance of troops.

19 : Hence: Measured and regular advance or movement, like that of soldiers moving in order; stately or deliberate walk; steady onward movement.

20 : The distance passed over in marching; as, an hour's march; a march of twenty miles.

21 : A piece of music designed or fitted to accompany and guide the movement of troops; a piece of music in the march form.

22 : The lord or officer who defended the marches or borders of a territory.

23 : Alt. of Merchet

24 : a. & n., fr. March, v.

25 : The wife or the widow of a marquis; a woman who has the rank and dignity of a marquis.

26 : Extremely rash; foolhardy. See under March, the month.

27 : A person living in the marches between England and Scotland or Wales.

28 : A kind of sweet bread or biscuit; a cake of pounded almonds and sugar.

29 : A warden of the marches; a marcher.

30 : The chief magistrate of a nome or nomarchy.

31 : of Nomarchy

32 : A province or territorial division of a kingdom, under the rule of a nomarch, as in modern Greece; a nome.

33 : To surpass in marching; to march faster than, or so as to leave behind.

34 : To march too far, or too much; to exhaust by marching.

35 : In Athens, originally, the military commanderin-chief; but, afterward, a civil magistrate who had jurisdiction in respect of strangers and sojourners. In other Grecian cities, a high military and civil officer.

(35) words is found which contain march in our database

For march word found data is following....

1 : Countermarched

imp. & p. p.

of Countermarch

2 : Countermarching

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Countermarch

3 : Countermarch

v. i.

To march back, or to march in reversed order.

4 : Countermarch

n.

A marching back; retrocession.

5 : Countermarch

n.

An evolution by which a body of troops change front or reverse the direction of march while retaining the same men in the front rank; also, a movement by which the rear rank becomes the front one, either with or without changing the right to the left.

6 : Countermarch

n.

A change of measures; alteration of conduct.

7 : Demarch

n.

March; walk; gait.

8 : Demarch

n.

A chief or ruler of a deme or district in Greece.

9 : Dismarch

v. i.

To march away.

10 : March

n.

The third month of the year, containing thirty-one days.

11 : March

n.

A territorial border or frontier; a region adjacent to a boundary line; a confine; -- used chiefly in the plural, and in English history applied especially to the border land on the frontiers between England and Scotland, and England and Wales.

12 : March

v. i.

To border; to be contiguous; to lie side by side.

13 : Marched

imp. & p. p.

of March

14 : Marching

p. pr. & vb. n.

of March

15 : March

v. i.

To move with regular steps, as a soldier; to walk in a grave, deliberate, or stately manner; to advance steadily.

16 : March

v. i.

To proceed by walking in a body or in military order; as, the German army marched into France.

17 : March

v. t.

TO cause to move with regular steps in the manner of a soldier; to cause to move in military array, or in a body, as troops; to cause to advance in a steady, regular, or stately manner; to cause to go by peremptory command, or by force.

18 : March

n.

The act of marching; a movement of soldiers from one stopping place to another; military progress; advance of troops.

19 : March

n.

Hence: Measured and regular advance or movement, like that of soldiers moving in order; stately or deliberate walk; steady onward movement.

20 : March

n.

The distance passed over in marching; as, an hour's march; a march of twenty miles.

21 : March

n.

A piece of music designed or fitted to accompany and guide the movement of troops; a piece of music in the march form.

22 : Marcher

n.

The lord or officer who defended the marches or borders of a territory.

23 : Marchet

n.

Alt. of Merchet

24 : Marching

a. & n., fr. March, v.

25 : Marchioness

n.

The wife or the widow of a marquis; a woman who has the rank and dignity of a marquis.

26 : March-mad

a.

Extremely rash; foolhardy. See under March, the month.

27 : Marchman

n.

A person living in the marches between England and Scotland or Wales.

28 : Marchpane

n.

A kind of sweet bread or biscuit; a cake of pounded almonds and sugar.

29 : March-ward

n.

A warden of the marches; a marcher.

30 : Nomarch

n.

The chief magistrate of a nome or nomarchy.

31 : Nomarchies

pl.

of Nomarchy

32 : Nomarchy

n.

A province or territorial division of a kingdom, under the rule of a nomarch, as in modern Greece; a nome.

33 : Outmarch

v. t.

To surpass in marching; to march faster than, or so as to leave behind.

34 : Overmarch

v. t. & i.

To march too far, or too much; to exhaust by marching.

35 : Polemarch

n.

In Athens, originally, the military commanderin-chief; but, afterward, a civil magistrate who had jurisdiction in respect of strangers and sojourners. In other Grecian cities, a high military and civil officer.

This word march uses (5) total characters with white space

This word march uses (5) total characters with white out space

This word march uses 5 unique characters: A C H M R

Number of all permutations npr for march word is (120)

Number of all combination ncr for march word is (120)

Similar matching soundex word for march

2 same character containing word for march

3 same character containing word For march

4 same character containing word For march

All permutations word for march

All combinations word for march

All similar letter combinations related to march

From Wikipedia

  • January
  • February
  • March
  • April
  • May
  • June
  • July
  • August
  • September
  • October
  • November
  • December
01020304
05060708091011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

March is the 3rd month of the year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. It is the second month to have a length of 31 days. In the Northern Hemisphere, the meteorological beginning of spring occurs on the first day of March. The March equinox on the 20th or 21st marks the astronomical beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and the beginning of autumn in the Southern Hemisphere, where September is the seasonal equivalent of the Northern Hemisphere's March.

From Wiktionary

See also: March, Märch, and marc'h

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Pronunciation
    • 1.2 Etymology 1
      • 1.2.1 Noun
        • 1.2.1.1 Derived terms
        • 1.2.1.2 Related terms
        • 1.2.1.3 Translations
      • 1.2.2 Verb
        • 1.2.2.1 Derived terms
        • 1.2.2.2 Translations
    • 1.3 Etymology 2
      • 1.3.1 Noun
        • 1.3.1.1 Derived terms
        • 1.3.1.2 Related terms
        • 1.3.1.3 Translations
      • 1.3.2 Verb
        • 1.3.2.1 Translations
    • 1.4 Etymology 3
      • 1.4.1 Noun
        • 1.4.1.1 Synonyms
        • 1.4.1.2 Translations
    • 1.5 Anagrams
  • 2 Welsh
    • 2.1 Etymology
    • 2.2 Pronunciation
    • 2.3 Noun
      • 2.3.1 Derived terms
    • 2.4 Mutation

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /mɑːtʃ/
  • (US) enPR: märch, IPA(key): /mɑɹtʃ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)tʃ

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English marchen, from Middle French marcher (to march, walk), from Old French marchier (to stride, to march, to trample), from Frankish *markōn (to mark, mark out, to press with the foot), from Proto-Germanic *markō (area, region, edge, rim, border), akin to Persian مرز‏ (marz), from Proto-Indo-European *mereg- (edge, boundary). Akin to Old English mearc, ġemearc (mark, boundary).

Noun[edit]

march (plural marches)

Soldiers marching
  1. A formal, rhythmic way of walking, used especially by soldiers, bands and in ceremonies.
  2. A political rally or parade
    Synonyms: protest, parade, rally
  3. Any song in the genre of music written for marching (see Wikipedia's article on this type of music)
  4. Steady forward movement or progression.
    the march of time
    Synonyms: process, advancement, progression
  5. (euchre) The feat of taking all the tricks of a hand.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
  • démarche
  • volksmarch
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

march (third-person singular simple present marches, present participle marching, simple past and past participle marched)

  1. (intransitive) To walk with long, regular strides, as a soldier does.
  2. (transitive) To cause someone to walk somewhere.
    • 1967, Sleigh, Barbara, Jessamy, 1993 edition, Sevenoaks, Kent: Bloomsbury, ISBN 0 340 19547 9, page 84:
      The old man heaved himself from the chair, seized Jessamy by her pinafore frill and marched her to the house.
  3. To go to war; to make military advances.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English marche (tract of land along a country's border), from Old French marche (boundary, frontier), from Frankish *marka, from Proto-Germanic *markō, from Proto-Indo-European *mereg- (edge, boundary).

Noun[edit]

march (plural marches)

  1. (now archaic, historical) A border region, especially one originally set up to defend a boundary.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte d’Arthur, Book V:
      Therefore, sir, be my counsayle, rere up your lyege peple and sende kynges and dewkes to loke unto your marchis, and that the mountaynes of Almayne be myghtyly kepte.
    Synonyms: frontier, marchland
  2. (historical) A region at a frontier governed by a marquess.
  3. The name for any of various territories with similar meanings or etymologies in their native languages.
    • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, IV:
      Juan's companion was a Romagnole, / But bred within the March of old Ancona [].
    Synonyms: county palatinate, county palatine
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

march (third-person singular simple present marches, present participle marching, simple past and past participle marched)

  1. (intransitive) To have common borders or frontiers
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svgThis entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

march (plural marches)

  1. (obsolete) Smallage.
Synonyms[edit]
  • smallage
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

  • charm

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *marx, from Proto-Celtic *markos, from Proto-Indo-European *márkos.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /marχ/

Noun[edit]

march m (plural meirch)

  1. horse, steed, stallion

Derived terms[edit]

  • marchog
  • dynfarch

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radicalsoftnasalaspirate
marchfarchunchangedunchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.