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1 : Opposed to the office or authority of magistrates.

2 : To agitate on all sides.

3 : of Damage

4 : of Endamage

5 : of Homage

6 : of Image

7 : Capacity for imagination.

8 : Capable of being imagined; conceivable.

9 : Characterized by imagination; imaginative; also, given to the use or rhetorical figures or imagins.

10 : Of or pertaining to an imago.

11 : Imagining; conceiving.

12 : An imaginer.

13 : In a imaginary manner; in imagination.

14 : The state or quality of being imaginary; unreality.

15 : Existing only in imagination or fancy; not real; fancied; visionary; ideal.

16 : An imaginary expression or quantity.

17 : Imaginative.

18 : The imagine-making power of the mind; the power to create or reproduce ideally an object of sense previously perceived; the power to call up mental imagines.

19 : The representative power; the power to reconstruct or recombine the materials furnished by direct apprehension; the complex faculty usually termed the plastic or creative power; the fancy.

20 : The power to recombine the materials furnished by experience or memory, for the accomplishment of an elevated purpose; the power of conceiving and expressing the ideal.

21 : A mental image formed by the action of the imagination as a faculty; a conception; a notion.

22 : Pertaining to, involving, or caused by, imagination.

23 : Idealism.

24 : Proceeding from, and characterized by, the imagination, generally in the highest sense of the word.

25 : Given to imagining; full of images, fancies, etc.; having a quick imagination; conceptive; creative.

26 : Unreasonably suspicious; jealous.

27 : of Imagine

28 : of Imagine

29 : To form in the mind a notion or idea of; to form a mental image of; to conceive; to produce by the imagination.

30 : To contrive in purpose; to scheme; to devise; to compass; to purpose. See Compass, v. t., 5.

31 : To represent to one's self; to think; to believe.

32 : To form images or conceptions; to conceive; to devise.

33 : To think; to suppose.

34 : One who forms ideas or conceptions; one who contrives.

35 : Imaginative.

36 : Unimaginable; inconceivable.

37 : A caste of priests, philosophers, and magicians, among the ancient Persians; hence, any holy men or sages of the East.

38 : Of or pertaining to the Magi.

39 : One of the Magi, or priests of the Zoroastrian religion in Persia; an adherent of the Zoroastrian religion.

40 : A comprehensive name for all of the pretended arts which claim to produce effects by the assistance of supernatural beings, or departed spirits, or by a mastery of secret forces in nature attained by a study of occult science, including enchantment, conjuration, witchcraft, sorcery, necromancy, incantation, etc.

41 : Alt. of Magical

42 : Pertaining to the hidden wisdom supposed to be possessed by the Magi; relating to the occult powers of nature, and the producing of effects by their agency.

43 : Performed by, or proceeding from, occult and superhuman agencies; done by, or seemingly done by, enchantment or sorcery. Hence: Seemingly requiring more than human power; imposing or startling in performance; producing effects which seem supernatural or very extraordinary; having extraordinary properties; as, a magic lantern; a magic square or circle.

44 : In a magical manner; by magic, or as if by magic.

45 : One skilled in magic; one who practices the black art; an enchanter; a necromancer; a sorcerer or sorceress; a conjurer.

46 : Alt. of Magilph

47 : See Megilp.

48 : Master; sir; -- a title of the Middle Ages, given to a person in authority, or to one having a license from a university to teach philosophy and the liberal arts.

49 : Of or pertaining to a master or magistrate, or one in authority; having the manner of a magister; official; commanding; authoritative. Hence: Overbearing; dictatorial; dogmatic.

50 : Pertaining to, produced by, or of the nature of, magistery. See Magistery, 2.

(50) words is found which contain magi in our database

For magi word found data is following....

1 : Antimagistrical

a.

Opposed to the office or authority of magistrates.

2 : Circumagitate

v. t.

To agitate on all sides.

3 : Damaging

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Damage

4 : Endamaging

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Endamage

5 : Homaging

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Homage

6 : Imaging

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Image

7 : Imaginability

n.

Capacity for imagination.

8 : Imaginable

a.

Capable of being imagined; conceivable.

9 : Imaginal

a.

Characterized by imagination; imaginative; also, given to the use or rhetorical figures or imagins.

10 : Imaginal

a.

Of or pertaining to an imago.

11 : Imaginant

a.

Imagining; conceiving.

12 : Imaginant

n.

An imaginer.

13 : Imaginarily

a.

In a imaginary manner; in imagination.

14 : Imaginariness

n.

The state or quality of being imaginary; unreality.

15 : Imaginary

a.

Existing only in imagination or fancy; not real; fancied; visionary; ideal.

16 : Imaginary

n.

An imaginary expression or quantity.

17 : Imaginate

a.

Imaginative.

18 : Imagination

n.

The imagine-making power of the mind; the power to create or reproduce ideally an object of sense previously perceived; the power to call up mental imagines.

19 : Imagination

n.

The representative power; the power to reconstruct or recombine the materials furnished by direct apprehension; the complex faculty usually termed the plastic or creative power; the fancy.

20 : Imagination

n.

The power to recombine the materials furnished by experience or memory, for the accomplishment of an elevated purpose; the power of conceiving and expressing the ideal.

21 : Imagination

n.

A mental image formed by the action of the imagination as a faculty; a conception; a notion.

22 : Imaginational

a.

Pertaining to, involving, or caused by, imagination.

23 : Imaginationalism

n.

Idealism.

24 : Imaginative

a.

Proceeding from, and characterized by, the imagination, generally in the highest sense of the word.

25 : Imaginative

a.

Given to imagining; full of images, fancies, etc.; having a quick imagination; conceptive; creative.

26 : Imaginative

a.

Unreasonably suspicious; jealous.

27 : Imagined

imp. & p. p.

of Imagine

28 : Imagining

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Imagine

29 : Imagine

v. t.

To form in the mind a notion or idea of; to form a mental image of; to conceive; to produce by the imagination.

30 : Imagine

v. t.

To contrive in purpose; to scheme; to devise; to compass; to purpose. See Compass, v. t., 5.

31 : Imagine

v. t.

To represent to one's self; to think; to believe.

32 : Imagine

v. i.

To form images or conceptions; to conceive; to devise.

33 : Imagine

v. i.

To think; to suppose.

34 : Imaginer

n.

One who forms ideas or conceptions; one who contrives.

35 : Imaginous

a.

Imaginative.

36 : Inimaginable

a.

Unimaginable; inconceivable.

37 : Magi

n. pl.

A caste of priests, philosophers, and magicians, among the ancient Persians; hence, any holy men or sages of the East.

38 : Magian

a.

Of or pertaining to the Magi.

39 : Magian

n.

One of the Magi, or priests of the Zoroastrian religion in Persia; an adherent of the Zoroastrian religion.

40 : Magic

a.

A comprehensive name for all of the pretended arts which claim to produce effects by the assistance of supernatural beings, or departed spirits, or by a mastery of secret forces in nature attained by a study of occult science, including enchantment, conjuration, witchcraft, sorcery, necromancy, incantation, etc.

41 : Magic

a.

Alt. of Magical

42 : Magical

a.

Pertaining to the hidden wisdom supposed to be possessed by the Magi; relating to the occult powers of nature, and the producing of effects by their agency.

43 : Magical

a.

Performed by, or proceeding from, occult and superhuman agencies; done by, or seemingly done by, enchantment or sorcery. Hence: Seemingly requiring more than human power; imposing or startling in performance; producing effects which seem supernatural or very extraordinary; having extraordinary properties; as, a magic lantern; a magic square or circle.

44 : Magically

adv.

In a magical manner; by magic, or as if by magic.

45 : Magician

n.

One skilled in magic; one who practices the black art; an enchanter; a necromancer; a sorcerer or sorceress; a conjurer.

46 : Magilp

n.

Alt. of Magilph

47 : Magilph

n.

See Megilp.

48 : Magister

n.

Master; sir; -- a title of the Middle Ages, given to a person in authority, or to one having a license from a university to teach philosophy and the liberal arts.

49 : Magisterial

a.

Of or pertaining to a master or magistrate, or one in authority; having the manner of a magister; official; commanding; authoritative. Hence: Overbearing; dictatorial; dogmatic.

50 : Magisterial

a.

Pertaining to, produced by, or of the nature of, magistery. See Magistery, 2.

This word magi uses (4) total characters with white space

This word magi uses (4) total characters with white out space

This word magi uses 4 unique characters: A G I M

Number of all permutations npr for magi word is (24)

Number of all combination ncr for magi word is (24)

Similar matching soundex word for magi

2 same character containing word for magi

3 same character containing word For magi

4 same character containing word For magi

All permutations word for magi

All combinations word for magi

All similar letter combinations related to magi

From Wikipedia

Magi (/ˈm/; singular magus /ˈmɡəs/; from Latin magus) denotes followers of Zoroastrianism or Zoroaster. The earliest known use of the word Magi is in the trilingual inscription written by Darius the Great, known as the Behistun Inscription. Old Persian texts, pre-dating the Hellenistic period, refer to a Magus as a Zurvanic, and presumably Zoroastrian, priest.

Pervasive throughout the Eastern Mediterranean and Western Asia until late antiquity and beyond, mágos, "Magian" or "magician", was influenced by (and eventually displaced) Greek goēs (γόης), the older word for a practitioner of magic, to include astrology, alchemy and other forms of esoteric knowledge. This association was in turn the product of the Hellenistic fascination for (Pseudo‑)Zoroaster, who was perceived by the Greeks to be the "Chaldean", "founder" of the Magi and "inventor" of both astrology and magic, a meaning that still survives in the modern-day words "magic" and "magician".[citation needed]

In English, the term "magi" is most commonly used in reference to the "μάγοι" from the east who visit Jesus in Chapter 2 of the Gospel of Matthew, and are now often translated as "wise men" in English versions.[1] The plural "magi" entered the English language from Latin around 1200, in reference to these. The singular appears considerably later, in the late 14th century, when it was borrowed from Old French in the meaning magician together with magic.

  1. ^ Matthew 2 in Greek

From Wiktionary

See also: Magi, mágí, magì, mägi, and Mägi

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Pronunciation
    • 1.2 Noun
    • 1.3 Anagrams
  • 2 Danish
    • 2.1 Noun
      • 2.1.1 Declension
      • 2.1.2 Synonyms
      • 2.1.3 Related terms
  • 3 Faroese
    • 3.1 Etymology
    • 3.2 Noun
      • 3.2.1 Declension
  • 4 Gothic
    • 4.1 Romanization
  • 5 Icelandic
    • 5.1 Etymology
    • 5.2 Pronunciation
    • 5.3 Noun
      • 5.3.1 Declension
  • 6 Indonesian
    • 6.1 Etymology
    • 6.2 Noun
    • 6.3 Synonyms
  • 7 Italian
    • 7.1 Pronunciation
    • 7.2 Noun
  • 8 Latin
    • 8.1 Noun
    • 8.2 References
  • 9 Norwegian Bokmål
    • 9.1 Etymology
    • 9.2 Noun
      • 9.2.1 Related terms
    • 9.3 References
  • 10 Norwegian Nynorsk
    • 10.1 Etymology
    • 10.2 Noun
      • 10.2.1 Related terms
    • 10.3 References
  • 11 Old Norse
    • 11.1 Etymology
    • 11.2 Noun
      • 11.2.1 Descendants
    • 11.3 References
  • 12 Romanian
    • 12.1 Noun

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /meɪˈd͡ʒaɪ/

Noun[edit]

magi

  1. plural of mage
  2. plural of magus

Anagrams[edit]

  • IMAG

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

magi c (singular definite magien, not used in plural form)

  1. magic

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

trolddom, trylleri

Related terms[edit]

magiker, magisk


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse magi, from Proto-Germanic *magô.

Noun[edit]

magi m (genitive singular maga, plural magar)

  1. stomach

Declension[edit]

m1SingularPlural
IndefiniteDefiniteIndefiniteDefinite
Nominativemagimaginmagarmagarnir
Accusativemagamaganmagarmagarnar
Dativemagamaganummagummagunum
Genitivemagamagansmagamaganna

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

magi

  1. Romanization of 𐌼𐌰𐌲𐌹

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse magi, from Proto-Germanic *magô.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmaːjɪ/

Noun[edit]

magi m (genitive singular maga, nominative plural magar)

  1. stomach
  2. (colloquial) tummy, belly

Declension[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch magie.

Noun[edit]

magi

  1. magic

Synonyms[edit]

  • sihir
  • kekuatan ajaib
  • tuah

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Rhymes: -adʒi

Noun[edit]

magi m

  1. plural of magio
  2. Magi (properly re magi)

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

magī

  1. nominative plural of magus
  2. genitive singular of magus
  3. vocative plural of magus

References[edit]

  • magi in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • magi in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • magi in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • magi in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
magi
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek μαγεία (mageía), from μάγος (mágos)

Noun[edit]

magi m (definite singular magien)

  1. magic

Related terms[edit]

  • magisk

References[edit]

  • “magi” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
magi
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek μαγεία (mageía), from μάγος (mágos)

Noun[edit]

magi m (definite singular magien)

  1. magic

Related terms[edit]

  • magisk

References[edit]

  • “magi” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *magô. Compare Old English and Old Frisian maga, Old Saxon and Old High German mago.

Noun[edit]

magi m

  1. stomach

Descendants[edit]

  • Icelandic: magi
  • Faroese: magi
  • Norwegian:
    • Norwegian Bokmål: mave, mage
    • Norwegian Nynorsk: mage
  • Old Swedish: maghi
    • Swedish: mage
  • Old Danish: maghæ
    • Danish: mave
  • Westrobothnian: maga
  • Elfdalian: magi
  • Jamtish: maga
  • Gutnish: mage
  • Scanian: mawe

References[edit]

  • magi in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • magi in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[2]
  • magi in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • magi in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Romanian[edit]

Noun[edit]

magi m pl

  1. plural of mag