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1 : A white, crystalline sugar, C6H12O6, isomeric with dextrose, obtained by the decomposition of milk sugar, and also from certain gums. When oxidized it forms mucic acid. Called also lactose (though it is not lactose proper).

2 : Sugar of milk or milk sugar; a crystalline sugar present in milk, and separable from the whey by evaporation and crystallization. It has a slightly sweet taste, is dextrorotary, and is much less soluble in water than either cane sugar or glucose. Formerly called lactin.

3 : See Galactose.

(3) words is found which contain lactose in our database

For lactose word found data is following....

1 : Galactose

n.

A white, crystalline sugar, C6H12O6, isomeric with dextrose, obtained by the decomposition of milk sugar, and also from certain gums. When oxidized it forms mucic acid. Called also lactose (though it is not lactose proper).

2 : Lactose

n.

Sugar of milk or milk sugar; a crystalline sugar present in milk, and separable from the whey by evaporation and crystallization. It has a slightly sweet taste, is dextrorotary, and is much less soluble in water than either cane sugar or glucose. Formerly called lactin.

3 : Lactose

n.

See Galactose.

This word lactose uses (7) total characters with white space

This word lactose uses (7) total characters with white out space

This word lactose uses 7 unique characters: A C E L O S T

Number of all permutations npr for lactose word is (5040)

Number of all combination ncr for lactose word is (5040)

Similar matching soundex word for lactose

2 same character containing word for lactose

3 same character containing word For lactose

All permutations word for lactose

All combinations word for lactose

All similar letter combinations related to lactose

From Wikipedia

Lactose (milk sugar)
Beta-D-Lactose.svg
Names
IUPAC name
β-D-galactopyranosyl-(1→4)-D-glucose
Other names
Milk sugar
4-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-D-glucose
Identifiers
CAS Number
  • 63-42-3 YesY
3D model (JSmol)
  • Interactive image
ChEBI
  • CHEBI:36218 YesY
ChemSpider
  • 5904 YesY
ECHA InfoCard100.000.509
EC Number200-559-2
PubChem CID
  • 6134
UNII
  • 3SY5LH9PMK N
Properties
Chemical formula
C12H22O11
Molar mass342.30 g/mol
Appearancewhite solid
Density1.525 g/cm3
Melting point202.8 °C (397.0 °F; 475.9 K)[1]
Solubility in water
19.5 g/100 mL[1][2]
Chiral rotation ([α]D)
+55.4°
Thermochemistry
5652 kJ/mol, 1351 kcal/mol, 16.5 kJ/g, 3.94 kcal/g
Hazards
NFPA 704
Flammability code 0: Will not burn. E.g., waterHealth code 1: Exposure would cause irritation but only minor residual injury. E.g., turpentineReactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g., liquid nitrogenSpecial hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
0
1
0
Flash point357.8 °C (676.0 °F; 631.0 K)[3]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
N verify (what is YesYN ?)
Infobox references

Lactose is a disaccharide sugar composed of galactose and glucose that is found in milk. Lactose makes up around 2–8% of milk (by weight),[4] although the amount varies among species and individuals, and milk with a reduced amount of lactose also exists. It can be extracted from sweet or sour whey. The name comes from lac (gen. lactis), the Latin word for milk, plus the -ose ending used to name sugars.[5] It has a formula of C12H22O11 and the hydrate formula C12H22O11·H2O, making it an isomer of sucrose.

  1. ^ a b [1]
  2. ^ The solubility of lactose in water is 18.9049 g at 25 °C, 25.1484 g at 40 °C and 37.2149 g at 60 °C per 100 g solution. Its solubility in ethanol is 0.0111 g at 40 °C and 0.0270 g at 60 °C per 100 g solution.Machado, José J. B.; Coutinho, João A.; Macedo, Eugénia A. (2001), "Solid–liquid equilibrium of α-lactose in ethanol/water" (PDF), Fluid Phase Equilibria, 173 (1): 121–34, doi:10.1016/S0378-3812(00)00388-5 . ds
  3. ^ Sigma Aldrich
  4. ^ Carper, Steve. "The Really BIG List of Lactose Percentages". Lactose Intolerance Clearinghouse. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  5. ^ In 1856, Louis Pasteur named galactose "lactose". See:
    • Pasteur (1856) "Note sur le sucre de lait" (Note on milk sugar), Comptes rendus, 42 : 347–351. From page 348: "Je propose de le nommer lactose." (I propose to name it lactose.)
    In 1860, Berthelot renamed it "galactose", and transferred the name "lactose" to what is now called lactose. See:
    • Marcellin Berthelot, Chimie organique fondée sur la synthèse [Organic chemistry based on synthesis] (Paris, France: Mallet-Bachelier, 1860), vol. 2, pp. 248–249 and pp. 268–270.

From Wiktionary

See also: Lactose

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Etymology
    • 1.2 Pronunciation
    • 1.3 Noun
      • 1.3.1 Synonyms
      • 1.3.2 Derived terms
      • 1.3.3 Translations
    • 1.4 Anagrams
  • 2 Dutch
    • 2.1 Etymology
    • 2.2 Pronunciation
    • 2.3 Noun
  • 3 French
    • 3.1 Etymology
    • 3.2 Pronunciation
    • 3.3 Noun
    • 3.4 Further reading
  • 4 Portuguese
    • 4.1 Etymology
    • 4.2 Pronunciation
    • 4.3 Noun
      • 4.3.1 Related terms

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
lactose
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French lactose, from Latin lac (milk) + -ose (derivation of sucrose). Coined by French chemist Marcelin Berthelot.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈlæk.təʊs/, /ˈlæk.təʊz/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈlæk.toʊs/

Noun[edit]

lactose (countable and uncountable, plural lactoses)

  1. (biochemistry) The disaccharide sugar of milk and dairy products, C12H22O11, a product of glucose and galactose used as a food and in medicinal compounds.

Synonyms[edit]

  • lactobiose

Derived terms[edit]

  • lactose-negative
  • lactose-positive

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

  • Castelo, Lacoste, alecost, coletas, locates, scatole, scotale, talcose, to scale, to-scale

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
lactose
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French lactose, formed from Latin lac (milk) +‎ -ose (sugar) (derivation of sucrose).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: lac‧to‧se

Noun[edit]

lactose f (uncountable)

  1. lactose

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Coined by French chemist Marcelin Berthelot, from Latin lac (milk) + -ose (derivation of sucrose). See also lait.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /lak.toz/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

lactose m (usually uncountable, plural lactoses)

  1. (biochemistry) lactose

Further reading[edit]

  • “lactose” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French lactose, formed from Latin lac (milk) +‎ -ose (sugar) (derivation of sucrose).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Rhymes: -ɔzi

Noun[edit]

lactose f (plural lactoses)

  1. (biochemistry) lactose (disaccharide sugar of milk)

Related terms[edit]

  • leite