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1 : Gracious; mild; benign.

2 : Easy to be spoken to or addressed; receiving others kindly and conversing with them in a free and friendly manner; courteous; sociable.

3 : Affability.

4 : Capable of being uttered or explained; utterable.

5 : Fiction; untruth; falsehood.

6 : Any story told to excite wonder; common talk; the theme of talk.

7 : The plot, story, or connected series of events, forming the subject of an epic or dramatic poem.

8 : A Feigned story or tale, intended to instruct or amuse; a fictitious narration intended to enforce some useful truth or precept; an apologue. See the Note under Apologue.

9 : To feign; to invent; to devise, and speak of, as true or real; to tell of falsely.

10 : To compose fables; hence, to write or speak fiction ; to write or utter what is not true.

11 : of Fable

12 : A writer of fables; a fabulist; a dealer in untruths or falsehoods.

13 : Not affable; reserved in social intercourse.

14 : Incapable of being expresses in words; unspeakable; unutterable; indescribable; as, the ineffable joys of heaven.

15 : The quality or state of being ineffable or unutterable; unspeakableness.

16 : Mischievous.

17 : That which is part fable and part truth; a mixture of truth and fable.

(17) words is found which contain fable in our database

For fable word found data is following....

1 : Affable

a.

Gracious; mild; benign.

2 : Affable

a.

Easy to be spoken to or addressed; receiving others kindly and conversing with them in a free and friendly manner; courteous; sociable.

3 : Affableness

n.

Affability.

4 : Effable

a.

Capable of being uttered or explained; utterable.

5 : Fable

n.

Fiction; untruth; falsehood.

6 : Fable

n.

Any story told to excite wonder; common talk; the theme of talk.

7 : Fable

n.

The plot, story, or connected series of events, forming the subject of an epic or dramatic poem.

8 : Fable

n.

A Feigned story or tale, intended to instruct or amuse; a fictitious narration intended to enforce some useful truth or precept; an apologue. See the Note under Apologue.

9 : Fable

v. t.

To feign; to invent; to devise, and speak of, as true or real; to tell of falsely.

10 : Fable

v. i.

To compose fables; hence, to write or speak fiction ; to write or utter what is not true.

11 : Fabled

imp. & p. p.

of Fable

12 : Fabler

n.

A writer of fables; a fabulist; a dealer in untruths or falsehoods.

13 : Inaffable

a.

Not affable; reserved in social intercourse.

14 : Ineffable

a.

Incapable of being expresses in words; unspeakable; unutterable; indescribable; as, the ineffable joys of heaven.

15 : Ineffableness

n.

The quality or state of being ineffable or unutterable; unspeakableness.

16 : Mischiefable

a.

Mischievous.

17 : Semifable

n.

That which is part fable and part truth; a mixture of truth and fable.

This word fable uses (5) total characters with white space

This word fable uses (5) total characters with white out space

This word fable uses 5 unique characters: A B E F L

Number of all permutations npr for fable word is (120)

Number of all combination ncr for fable word is (120)

Similar matching soundex word for fable

2 same character containing word for fable

3 same character containing word For fable

4 same character containing word For fable

All permutations word for fable

All combinations word for fable

All similar letter combinations related to fable

From Wikipedia

Anthropomorphic cat guarding geese, Egypt, ca. 1120 BCE

Fable is a literary genre: a succinct fictional story, in prose or verse, that features animals, legendary creatures, plants, inanimate objects, or forces of nature that are anthropomorphized (given human qualities, such as the ability to speak human language) and that illustrates or leads to a particular moral lesson (a "moral"), which may at the end be added explicitly as a pithy maxim.

A fable differs from a parable in that the latter excludes animals, plants, inanimate objects, and forces of nature as actors that assume speech or other powers of humankind.

Usage has not always been so clearly distinguished. In the King James Version of the New Testament, "μῦθος" ("mythos") was rendered by the translators as "fable"[1] in the First Epistle to Timothy, the Second Epistle to Timothy, the Epistle to Titus and the First Epistle of Peter.[2]

A person who writes fables is a fabulist.

  1. ^ For example, in First Timothy, "neither give heed to fables...", and "refuse profane and old wives' fables..." (1 Tim 1:4 and 4:4, respectively).
  2. ^ Strong's 3454. μύθος muthos moo’-thos; perhaps from the same as 3453 (through the idea of tuition); a tale, i.e. fiction ("myth"):—fable.
    "For we have not followed cunningly devised fables, when we made known unto you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but were eyewitnesses of his majesty." (2nd Peter 1:16)

From Wiktionary

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Etymology
    • 1.2 Pronunciation
    • 1.3 Noun
      • 1.3.1 Derived terms
      • 1.3.2 Translations
    • 1.4 Verb
      • 1.4.1 Translations
    • 1.5 References
    • 1.6 Anagrams
  • 2 French
    • 2.1 Etymology
    • 2.2 Pronunciation
    • 2.3 Noun
      • 2.3.1 Synonyms
    • 2.4 Further reading
  • 3 Old French
    • 3.1 Etymology
    • 3.2 Noun
      • 3.2.1 Synonyms

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
fable
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old French fable, from Latin fabula, from fā(rī) (to speak, say) + -bula (instrumental suffix). See Ban, and compare fabulous, fame.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfeɪbəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪbəl

Noun[edit]

fable (plural fables)

  1. A fictitious narrative intended to enforce some useful truth or precept, usually with animals, etc. as characters; an apologue. Prototypically, Aesop's Fables.
    Synonyms: morality play
  2. Any story told to excite wonder; common talk; the theme of talk.
    • 1 Timothy 4:7,
      Old wives' fables.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Alfred Tennyson, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      We grew / The fable of the city where we dwelt.
    Synonyms: legend
  3. Fiction; untruth; falsehood.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Joseph Addison, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      It would look like a fable to report that this gentleman gives away a great fortune by secret methods.
  4. The plot, story, or connected series of events forming the subject of an epic or dramatic poem.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Dryden, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      The moral is the first business of the poet; this being formed, he contrives such a design or fable as may be most suitable to the moral.

Derived terms[edit]

  • personal fable

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

fable (third-person singular simple present fables, present participle fabling, simple past and past participle fabled)

  1. (intransitive, archaic) To compose fables; hence, to write or speak fiction; to write or utter what is not true.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1, Act IV, Scene 2,[1]
      He fables not; I hear the enemy:
      Out, some light horsemen, and peruse their wings.
    • 1706, Matthew Prior, “An Ode, Humbly Inscribed to the Queen,” stanza 17, in Samuel Johnson (editor), The Works of the English Poets, London, 1779, Volume 30, p. 254,[2]
      Vain now the tales which fabling poets tell,
      That wavering Conquest still desires to rove!
      In Marlborough’s camp the goddess knows to dwell:
      Long as the hero’s life remains her love.
    • 1852, Matthew Arnold, Empedocles on Etna, Act II, in Empedocles on Etna and Other Poems, London: B. Fellowes, p. 50,[3]
      He fables, yet speaks truth.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To feign; to invent; to devise, and speak of, as true or real; to tell of falsely; to recount in the form of a fable.
    • 1674, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book VI, lines 288-292,[4]
      [] err not, that so shall end
      The strife which thou callest evil, but we style
      The strife of glory; which we mean to win,
      Or turn this Heaven itself into the Hell
      Thou fablest []
    • 1691, Arthur Gorges (translator), The Wisdom of the Ancients by Francis Bacon (1609), London, “Cassandra, or, Divination,” [5]
      The Poets Fable, That Apollo being enamoured of Cassandra, was by her many shifts and cunning slights still deluded in his Desire []

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • fable in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for fable in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]

  • befal

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin fabula

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

fable f (plural fables)

  1. fable, story

Synonyms[edit]

  • conte
  • histoire

Further reading[edit]

  • “fable” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin fabula

Noun[edit]

fable f (oblique plural fables, nominative singular fable, nominative plural fables)

  1. fable, story
    • circa 1250, Rutebeuf, Ci encoumence la lections d'ypocrisie et d'umilité:
      Ne vos wel faire longue fable
      I don't want to tell you a long story

Synonyms[edit]

  • conte
  • estoire