Being Search helps find more words for games such as Combination,Permutation,Scrabble and Word With Friends, digest.See more.

1 : A compilation of statutes or decisions analytically arranged. The term is applied in a general sense to the Pandects of Justinian (see Pandect), but is also specially given by authors to compilations of laws on particular topics; a summary of laws; as, Comyn's Digest; the United States Digest.

2 : That which is digested; especially, that which is worked over, classified, and arranged under proper heads or titles

3 : To suppurate; to generate pus, as an ulcer.

4 : To undergo digestion; as, food digests well or ill.

5 : To quiet or abate, as anger or grief.

6 : To ripen; to mature.

7 : To dispose to suppurate, or generate healthy pus, as an ulcer or wound.

8 : To soften by heat and moisture; to expose to a gentle heat in a boiler or matrass, as a preparation for chemical operations.

9 : Hence: To bear comfortably or patiently; to be reconciled to; to brook.

10 : To appropriate for strengthening and comfort.

11 : To think over and arrange methodically in the mind; to reduce to a plan or method; to receive in the mind and consider carefully; to get an understanding of; to comprehend.

12 : To separate (the food) in its passage through the alimentary canal into the nutritive and nonnutritive elements; to prepare, by the action of the digestive juices, for conversion into blood; to convert into chyme.

13 : To distribute or arrange methodically; to work over and classify; to reduce to portions for ready use or application; as, to digest the laws, etc.

14 : of Digest

15 : In a digested or well-arranged manner; methodically.

16 : A strong closed vessel, in which bones or other substances may be subjected, usually in water or other liquid, to a temperature above that of boiling, in order to soften them.

17 : A medicine or an article of food that aids digestion, or strengthens digestive power.

18 : One who digests.

19 : The quality of being digestible.

20 : Capable of being digested.

21 : The quality of being digestible; digestibility.

22 : of Digest

23 : Generation of pus; suppuration.

24 : The conversion of food, in the stomach and intestines, into soluble and diffusible products, capable of being absorbed by the blood.

25 : The act or process of digesting; reduction to order; classification; thoughtful consideration.

26 : A tonic.

27 : A substance which, when applied to a wound or ulcer, promotes suppuration.

28 : That which aids digestion, as a food or medicine.

29 : Pertaining to digestion; having the power to cause or promote digestion; as, the digestive ferments.

30 : See Digester.

31 : Digestion.

(31) words is found which contain digest in our database

For digest word found data is following....

1 : Digest

v. t.

A compilation of statutes or decisions analytically arranged. The term is applied in a general sense to the Pandects of Justinian (see Pandect), but is also specially given by authors to compilations of laws on particular topics; a summary of laws; as, Comyn's Digest; the United States Digest.

2 : Digest

v. t.

That which is digested; especially, that which is worked over, classified, and arranged under proper heads or titles

3 : Digest

v. i.

To suppurate; to generate pus, as an ulcer.

4 : Digest

v. i.

To undergo digestion; as, food digests well or ill.

5 : Digest

v. t.

To quiet or abate, as anger or grief.

6 : Digest

v. t.

To ripen; to mature.

7 : Digest

v. t.

To dispose to suppurate, or generate healthy pus, as an ulcer or wound.

8 : Digest

v. t.

To soften by heat and moisture; to expose to a gentle heat in a boiler or matrass, as a preparation for chemical operations.

9 : Digest

v. t.

Hence: To bear comfortably or patiently; to be reconciled to; to brook.

10 : Digest

v. t.

To appropriate for strengthening and comfort.

11 : Digest

v. t.

To think over and arrange methodically in the mind; to reduce to a plan or method; to receive in the mind and consider carefully; to get an understanding of; to comprehend.

12 : Digest

v. t.

To separate (the food) in its passage through the alimentary canal into the nutritive and nonnutritive elements; to prepare, by the action of the digestive juices, for conversion into blood; to convert into chyme.

13 : Digest

v. t.

To distribute or arrange methodically; to work over and classify; to reduce to portions for ready use or application; as, to digest the laws, etc.

14 : Digested

imp. & p. p.

of Digest

15 : Digestedly

adv.

In a digested or well-arranged manner; methodically.

16 : Digester

n.

A strong closed vessel, in which bones or other substances may be subjected, usually in water or other liquid, to a temperature above that of boiling, in order to soften them.

17 : Digester

n.

A medicine or an article of food that aids digestion, or strengthens digestive power.

18 : Digester

n.

One who digests.

19 : Digestibility

n.

The quality of being digestible.

20 : Digestible

a.

Capable of being digested.

21 : Digestibleness

n.

The quality of being digestible; digestibility.

22 : Digesting

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Digest

23 : Digestion

n.

Generation of pus; suppuration.

24 : Digestion

n.

The conversion of food, in the stomach and intestines, into soluble and diffusible products, capable of being absorbed by the blood.

25 : Digestion

n.

The act or process of digesting; reduction to order; classification; thoughtful consideration.

26 : Digestive

n.

A tonic.

27 : Digestive

n.

A substance which, when applied to a wound or ulcer, promotes suppuration.

28 : Digestive

n.

That which aids digestion, as a food or medicine.

29 : Digestive

a.

Pertaining to digestion; having the power to cause or promote digestion; as, the digestive ferments.

30 : Digestor

n.

See Digester.

31 : Digesture

n.

Digestion.

This word digest uses (6) total characters with white space

This word digest uses (6) total characters with white out space

This word digest uses 6 unique characters: D E G I S T

Number of all permutations npr for digest word is (720)

Number of all combination ncr for digest word is (720)

Similar matching soundex word for digest

2 same character containing word for digest

3 same character containing word For digest

All permutations word for digest

All combinations word for digest

All similar letter combinations related to digest

From Wikipedia

Digest may refer to:

In biology:

  • Digestion of food
  • Restriction digest

In literature or publication:

  • The Digest, formerly the English and Empire Digest
  • Digest size magazine format
  • Digest (Roman law), also known as Pandects, a digest of Roman law

In computer science or electronic security:

  • Digest, a MIME Multipart Subtype
  • Digest access authentication
  • Digital Geographic Exchange Standard
  • Email digest
  • Message digest or hash algorithm (in cryptography)

Other uses:

  • trade name of the drug Lansoprazole

From Wiktionary

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Etymology 1
      • 1.1.1 Pronunciation
      • 1.1.2 Verb
        • 1.1.2.1 Synonyms
        • 1.1.2.2 Translations
    • 1.2 Etymology 2
      • 1.2.1 Pronunciation
      • 1.2.2 Noun
        • 1.2.2.1 Usage notes
        • 1.2.2.2 Translations
    • 1.3 Anagrams
  • 2 Old French
    • 2.1 Etymology
    • 2.2 Adjective

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
digest
Wikipedia

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for digest in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English digesten, from Latin digestus, past participle of dīgerō (carry apart), from dī- (for dis- (apart)) + gerō (I carry), influenced by Middle French digestion.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: dī-jĕstʹ, də-jĕstʹ, IPA(key): /daɪˈdʒɛst/, /dəˈdʒɛst/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛst

Verb[edit]

digest (third-person singular simple present digests, present participle digesting, simple past and past participle digested)

  1. (transitive) To distribute or arrange methodically; to work over and classify; to reduce to portions for ready use or application.
    to digest laws
    • Blair
      joining them together and digesting them into order
    • Shakespeare
      We have cause to be glad that matters are so well digested.
  2. (transitive) To separate (the food) in its passage through the alimentary canal into the nutritive and nonnutritive elements; to prepare, by the action of the digestive juices, for conversion into blood; to convert into chyme.
  3. (transitive) To think over and arrange methodically in the mind; to reduce to a plan or method; to receive in the mind and consider carefully; to get an understanding of; to comprehend.
    • Sir H. Sidney
      Feelingly digest the words you speak in prayer.
    • Shakespeare
      How shall this bosom multiplied digest / The senate's courtesy?
    • Book of Common Prayer
      Grant that we may in such wise hear them [the Scriptures], read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest them.
  4. To bear comfortably or patiently; to be reconciled to; to brook.
    • Coleridge
      I never can digest the loss of most of Origen's works.
  5. (transitive, chemistry) To expose to a gentle heat in a boiler or matrass, as a preparation for chemical operations.
  6. (intransitive) To undergo digestion.
    Food digests well or badly.
  7. (medicine, obsolete, intransitive) To suppurate; to generate pus, as an ulcer.
  8. (medicine, obsolete, transitive) To cause to suppurate, or generate pus, as an ulcer or wound.
  9. (obsolete, transitive) To ripen; to mature.
    • Jeremy Taylor
      well-digested fruits
  10. (obsolete, transitive) To quieten or reduce (a negative feeling, such as anger or grief)
Synonyms[edit]
  • (distribute or arrange methodically): arrange, sort, sort out
  • (separate food in the alimentary canal):
  • (think over and arrange methodically in the mind): sort out
  • (chemistry, soften by heat and moisture):
  • (undergo digestion):
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin digesta, neuter plural of digestus, past participle of digero (separate)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: dīʹjĕst, IPA(key): /ˈdaɪdʒɛst/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛst

Noun[edit]

digest (plural digests)

  1. That which is digested; especially, that which is worked over, classified, and arranged under proper heads or titles
  2. A compilation of statutes or decisions analytically arranged; a summary of laws.
    Comyn's Digest
    the United States Digest
  3. Any collection of articles, as an Internet mailing list "digest" including a week's postings, or a magazine arranging a collection of writings.
    Reader's Digest is published monthly.
    The weekly email digest contains all the messages exchanged during the past week.
  4. (cryptography) The result of applying a hash function to a message.
Usage notes[edit]
  • (compilation of statutes or decisions analytically arranged): The term is applied in a general sense to the Pandects of Justinian, but is also specially given by authors to compilations of laws on particular topics.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

  • gisted, tidges

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin dīgestus.

Adjective[edit]

digest m (oblique and nominative feminine singular digeste)

  1. digested